Sudan Crisis: Ruling Military Foils Coup Attempt

  • Sudan has been in a crisis since protests erupted against former President Omar al-Bashir in December.
  • The protests led to the army's overthrow of Bashir on April 11.
  • Reporters found evidence that the attack on protesters last month was carried out on the orders of the country's top leadership and was planned in advance.

Sudan’s ruling transitional military has foiled a “coup attempt” aimed at “blocking the deal” with opposition representatives. The head of the Security Committee Council, Jamal Omar Ibrahim, said that a number of officers and soldiers has been arrested.

The announcement of the attempted coup failed after the agreement of the military council and opposition representatives to end the political deadlock in the country. Ibrahim said that 12 officers were arrested, including seven in service and five in pensions and four officers were detained.

Omar al-Bashir was President of Sudan from the June 1989 military coup until his own overthrow in April 2019. In 2009, he became the first sitting head of state to be indicted for war crimes, for allegedly directing a campaign of mass killing, rape, and pillage against civilians in Darfur. On 13 May 2019, prosecutors charged al-Bashir with “inciting and participating in” the killing of protesters.

He pointed out that authorities are working to arrest others, including the leader of the failed coup attempt, according to the Sudanese News Agency (SUNA). Ibrahim explained that the attempt was planned in a timely manner to preempt the agreement between the military and the demonstrators.

Ibrahim said that the armed forces, rapid support forces, security, intelligence, and police will remain keen on the security and stability of the country and secure the gains and achieve the highest national goals and access to power through the ballot box, according to the Sudanese News Agency.

The announcement of the failed coup attempt came at a time when legal advisers to the military and protesters leaders were discussing the details of the agreement between the two sides at a hotel in Khartoum. The agreement aims to form a transitional body to administer the government, after mediation by the African Union and Ethiopia.

Sudan or the Sudan, officially the Republic of the Sudan, is a country in Northeast Africa. It has a population of 39 million people (2016 estimate) and occupies a total area of 1,886,068 square kilometres (728,215 square miles), making it the third-largest country in Africa. Sudan’s predominant religion is Islam, and its official languages are Arabic and English. The capital is Khartoum, located at the confluence of the Blue and White Nile.

Sudan has been in a crisis since protests erupted against former President Omar al-Bashir in December. The protests led to the army’s overthrow of Bashir on April 11. The tension between the military leaders who took power in the country and opposition forces escalated after a bloody raid on the sit-in near the army headquarters in Khartoum, killing a number of protesters and injuring hundreds on June 3. The sit-in followed the collapse of talks between the military and demonstrators in May.

Intensive mediation of the African Union and Ethiopia led to a July 5 consensus on forming a “civilian and military” sovereign council to manage the country.

Reporters found evidence that the attack on protesters last month was carried out on the orders of the country’s top leadership and was planned in advance. Dozens of protesters were killed outside the army headquarters in Khartoum when swift support forces broke up a sit-in calling for the handover of power to a civilian government. Two of the rapid support forces – who took part in the sit-in – said that the command was given to break the sit-in and that the instructions were issued two weeks before the implementation.

Rapid support forces are under the command of Mohammed Hamdan Diklu, a well-known representative, who is a representative head of the military. Military leaders deny responsibility for the sit-in attack and blamed the violence on “rogue” elements.

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Doris Mkwaya

I am a journalist, with more than 12 years of experience as a reporter, author, editor, and journalism lecturer." I've worked as a reporter, editor and journalism lecturer, and am very enthusiastic about bringing what I've learned to this site. 

 


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