Germany Returns Group of Afghan Asylum Seekers

  • Despite protests and criticism, the German government has returned a number of Afghan citizens to their country.
  • This is the sixth mass deportation of Afghan citizens from Germany since December 2018.
  • In recent months, the number of civilian casualties in military conflicts in Afghanistan has increased.

Despite protests and criticism, the German government has returned a number of Afghan citizens to their country. The forced return of Afghan asylum seekers and immigrants began last December. German news agencies on Wednesday quoted Kabul airport officials saying that a plane originating in Germany with seven Afghans landed at the airport at 6 am local time.

This is the sixth mass deportation of Afghan citizens from Germany since December 2018. So far, a total of 645 people have been returned to Afghanistan against their will. The forced return of Afghan citizens to their country is widely criticized. Critics say Afghanistan is not safe due to the intensification of extremist Islamist activity by the Taliban and the Islamic State (IS) terrorist group, which takes a number of lives every day.

The right of asylum (sometimes called right of political asylum, from the Ancient Greek word ἄσυλον) is an ancient juridical concept, under which a person persecuted by one’s own country may be protected by another sovereign authority, such as another country or church official, who in medieval times could offer sanctuary. This right was recognized by the Egyptians, the Greeks, and the Hebrews, from whom it was adopted into Western tradition.

As a group of Afghan refugees returns to Kabul,  Reuters news agency quoted local officials saying Wednesday that at least four pro-government forces were killed by Taliban militants. It is also said that several civilians were injured in an attack on a government military checkpoint in Herat province in southern Afghanistan. In recent months, the number of civilian casualties in military conflicts in Afghanistan has increased. The UN estimates that in July alone, six civilians were killed and injured in Afghanistan.

July, Afghanistan’s bloodiest month

It has been the bloodiest month in Afghanistan since May 7, according to the UN. Accordingly, the number of civilian casualties in July alone was nearly half of all those killed so far this year. About ten days ago, two people were killed and more than five injured after a suicide bomber struck a wedding in a Shiite-populated district of Kabul. Terrorists claimed responsibility for the attack.

Taliban representatives and the US government have been in talks to come up with a political solution to ending the crisis in Afghanistan. The ninth round of talks began last week, after which the two sides expressed optimism about a deal in the near future. The Taliban have not stopped their military operations despite these negotiations.

US and Taliban Ahead of Final Agreement

The final agreement between the US and the Taliban is to pave the way for direct talks between Islamists and the Afghan central government. The United States has announced its readiness to withdraw troops after the deal with the Taliban is finalized. Washington, meanwhile, has pledged to withdraw its troops from Afghanistan following commitments by the Taliban, including agreeing not to cooperate with al-Qaeda and other terrorist groups, adhering to a ceasefire and stopping military operations.

The forced repatriation of Afghan refugees and asylum seekers from Germany has received widespread domestic and international criticism. Dominique Barch, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees in Berlin, urged the German government to conduct a case-by-case review of the policy of returning Afghan refugees to Afghanistan. He believes that much of Afghanistan, including Kabul, are not safe for deported Afghan migrants.

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Benedict Kasigara

I have been working as a freelance editor/writer since 2006. My specialist subject is film and television having worked for over 10 years from 2005 during which time I was the editor of the BFI Film and Television.


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