Dorian Death Toll at 43, Likely to Increase, in Bahamas

  • At least 70,000 people need immediate direct help with basic necessities.
  • According to a spokesperson for Prime Minister Hubert Minnis, the death toll is most likely to "increase significantly."
  • A whole range of military units, emergency aid organizations and companies have since been mobilized to help the hurricane victims in the Bahamas.

Hurricane Dorian, which recently struck the Bahamas, has so far claimed at least 43 lives. According to reports by the country’s local authorities, the death toll is most likely to rise since several people are reported to be still missing. The hurricane has caused catastrophic damage that has never been witnessed before in the Caribbean country’s history.

Hubert Minnis is the 4th and current Prime Minister of the Bahamas. Minnis is the leader of the center-right Free National Movement, and became Prime Minister after elections in 2017.

According to research, and subsequent reports by the United Nations, at least 70,000 people need immediate direct help with basic necessities, including clean drinking water, food, medicine, and shelter. The devastation is becoming more evident now that the floods in the Bahamas are slowly receding. The damage is particularly devastating on the northern islands, where more than half of the homes were destroyed. Thirty-five people died on the Abaco Islands, while eight people were killed in Grand Bahama.

According to a spokesperson for Prime Minister Hubert Minnis, the death toll is most likely to “increase significantly,” because many people are still missing, and are highly likely to have been killed by the hurricane. “Forty-three is the official count, many missing and this number is expected to grow significantly,” stated Erica Wells Cox.

On a website where friends and family members can report missing persons, “Dorian People Search Bahamas,” more than 6,600 names have so far been registered.

Military Lends Helping Hand

A whole range of military units, emergency aid organizations and companies have since been mobilized to help the hurricane victims in the Bahamas. The United Nations, the American government and the British Navy, among others, are active in the area. The Red Cross is also standing by in the capital, Nassau, although providing assistance is still difficult at the moment. The airport on Grand Bahama has been destroyed, and connecting roads are still submerged under water. Currently, many islands can only be accessed by helicopters.

A Category 5 hurricane is the highest category, according to the Saffir–Simpson scale. They involve sustained winds of 157 mph (252 km/h) or higher, and typically cause catastrophic damage upon landfall.

Dorian’s Destruction

Dorian arrived in the Bahamas on Sunday as a category five storm, with a sustained wind force of 297 kilometers per hour. The storm stuck for days and then continued, albeit in a reduced form, on Wednesday.

On Friday, the hurricane arrived in the US state of North Carolina. Hundreds of people are now trapped there because they cannot leave their homes due to the floods. According to Governor Roy Cooper, “intensive assistance” is urgently needed. In the coastal areas, in particular, life-threatening situations have arisen due to storm surge. Nothing is known about possible deaths.

Earlier, Gov. Cooper appealed to the people in northeastern North Carolina to continue to shelter in place and keep off the roads. “Look out for quick rising storm surge and flash flooding at the coast. Do not try to return home until your local officials have said it is safe to do so. We can not let our guard down,” said the Governor. The hurricane is now heading towards Canada in a further weakened form.

Only $1/click

Submit Your Ad Here

Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

Leave a Reply