Three Killed, Dozens Injured as Typhoon Faxai Hits Japan

  • One Tokyo woman in her 50s lost her life after she was blown off her feet by the strong wind and into a wall.
  • Authorities issued voluntary evacuation warnings to more than 390,000 people, as forecasters cautioned the rain and wind could reach “record” proportions.
  • Typhoons and tropical storms are very common in Japan.

At least three people are dead and dozens are injured after a powerful typhoon swept Tokyo in the early hours of Monday morning. The typhoon caused power cuts and major disruptions to the nation’s transport sector, inconveniencing thousands of early morning commuters.

Typhoon Faxai is a Category 1 typhoon which hit Tokyo on September 9. It is the strongest typhoon to hit Tokyo in recorded history, tying Typhoon Helen in 1958 for lowest recorded pressure, and surpassing Typhoon Higos in 2002 for the strongest sustained wind speed in landfall.

According to police, one Tokyo woman in her 50s lost her life after she was blown off her feet by the strong wind and into a wall. A security surveillance camera captured the unfortunate incident. Elsewhere, an 87-year-old man lost his life in the town of Otaki after he was struck by a tree while trying to clear debris. More than 30 people were injured in the area, with one of them sustaining serious injuries after the collapse of a golf training facility that fell on the roof of his home.

Accompanied by wind gusts of over 200 km/h, Typhoon Faxai landed in the night along the Chiba region, southeast of the capital, after crossing the bay of Tokyo. Initially, the local weather agency had warned of strong winds in eastern as well as central Japan, including the capital Tokyo. As a result, many airlines canceled a number of flights. That, in addition to the closure of major roads, disrupted transportation in the country to a large level.

Authorities issued voluntary evacuation warnings to more than 390,000 people, as forecasters cautioned the rain and wind could reach “record” proportions. On Monday, several schools in the capital city remained closed because of wind-related hazards, which are expected to remain high even after the typhoon has passed, leading to falling objects. In the aftermath of the storm, Tokyo city streets were littered with bits of shop signs, pieces of roofs or verandas torn off, as well as trees, shredded umbrellas and rubbish in general.

The Tokyo Metro is a major rapid transit system in Tokyo, Japan. In 2014, the Tokyo Metro had an average daily ridership of 6.84 million passengers. The Tokyo Metro is made up of nine lines operating on 195.1 kilometers (121.2 mi) of route.

Transport disruption

The typhoon also damaged rail lines, including a tree fall on a line linking Tokyo to the southern suburbs, towards Yokohama.
Until mid-day Monday, rail transport was in significant disruption. The lines usually used by millions of Japanese to get to work were completely halted.

One hundred high-speed trains connecting Tokyo to cities in central and western Japan were also canceled. Factories, including Nissan and Sony, were forced to stop production on Monday because of floods and power cuts.

Risk of landslides

The weather agency warned of possible subsequent landslides in the northern Chiba and Fukushima regions. Typhoons and tropical storms are very common in Japan. They are often stronger in late summer and early autumn, especially in the southwest. In mid-August, the mighty tropical cyclone Krosa hit the west, with strong winds and torrential rains that killed one person. In late August, violent floods killed three people in the southwest.

Only $1/click

Submit Your Ad Here

Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

Leave a Reply