US Embassy Warns Against Fraud in Afghan Elections

  • US Ambassador John Bass had said he was worried about various reports on when the IEC would open the National Center for Voting.
  • Candidates had asked the Afghan election commission not to count votes without biometrics because they believed the turnout had been "exaggerated."
  • One of the major differences between these Afghan elections and previous presidential elections is the universal use of biometrics.

The US Embassy, ​​whose staff recently visited the Afghan Election Commission and the commission’s work process, said “There’s no place for fraud in Afghan Elections.” The US Embassy in Kabul wrote on its official Twitter page that its staff has access to the Afghan Election Commission Information Center and appreciates the hard work of Afghan election officials.

The Embassy of the United States of America in Kabul is the diplomatic mission of the United States of America in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. The U.S. Embassy in Kabul was elevated in May 1948 from the U.S. Kabul Legation.

The embassy added that Afghan voters are assured “only legitimate, transparent and real votes are counted.” About a week ago, US Ambassador John Bass had said in Kabul that he was worried about various reports on when the IEC would open the National Center for Voting. Mr. Bass wrote on his official Twitter page, “it’s important for the IEC to clarify for domestic observers and the Afghan people.”

The Afghan Election Commission also announced that US Deputy Assistant Secretary Crane Dicker had met with members of the commission on the process of holding the election and summarizing the results at its headquarters. She added that the United States has taken responsibility for supporting the Afghan people and the process, and has invested in institutionalizing democracy in the country for the past five years and is ready to work with the Afghan people for another five years.

In recent days, a number of presidential candidates have protested that they have cheated a number of candidates in this year’s presidential election. Referring to the high votes in the provinces of Kandahar, Paktia, Nangarhar, Helmand, Baghlan, and Khost, they claimed that the provinces were rigged and a number of non-biometric votes were thrown out.

The candidates had asked the Afghan election commission not to count votes without biometrics because they believed the turnout had been “exaggerated” by the IEC. The turnout for the Afghan presidential election was announced by the Election Commission at 4,400 centers across Afghanistan at 2.562 million people. The turnout may change eventually, the election commission said. The commission has insisted it will not count any votes without biometrics and fakes.

At the same time, the IEC has announced that a number of presidential candidates are pressuring the commission to announce the results early. Yesterday, one candidate had asked the international community to put pressure on the election commission to announce the election results sooner.

Presidential elections were held in Afghanistan on September 28, 2019. The elections were originally scheduled for 20 April, but the Independent Election Commission twice announced delays.

One of the major differences between these Afghan elections and previous presidential elections is the universal use of biometrics. However, in last year’s parliamentary elections, neither the candidates nor the voters were happy about this technology. The Afghan Election Commission claims that it has learned a lot from the problems in the parliamentary elections in using this device and has resolved the problems. In the Afghan parliamentary elections that took place about a year ago, the machines were inoperable, destroyed, or lost in some centers, causing many to cast ballots without biometric barcodes.

In the run-up to the presidential election, the Electoral Commission has worked hard to solve the problems of the past by sending 5,000 devices to its transparency. Around 5,000 machines have been sent to the polling stations for 4,000 polling stations and 6,000 storage units to be used if the machine fails or fails to work. In the previous round, the lack of familiarity with the IEC staff on how this device worked was another problem for voters, but now four thousand machines have been used to train IEC staff to avoid repeating the previous problem.

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George Mtimba

George clarifies how the news is changing the world, how world news trends affect you. Also, George is a professional journalist, a freelance news reporter and writer who is passionate with current world news.


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