Are There Any Geopolitical Winners in Libya Since Gaddafi’s Death 8 Years Ago?

  • The death of Gaddafi went viral via videos posted on Facebook and other popular social media platforms.
  • Since the death of Gaddafi, Libya has become a hotbed for terrorists and is in complete chaos.
  • Previously, Libya was one of the top nations on the African continent for quality of life.

Muammar Mohammed Abu Minyar al-Gaddafi was murdered 8 years ago. Gaddafi, commonly known as Colonel Gaddafi, was a Libyan revolutionary, politician, and political theorist. Shortly after his death, it was announced that the war in Libya was over. In reality, the war mutated into a new trajectory. Even the worst pessimists could not have predicted the ramifications. Former US President Barack Obama scarcely admitted it was a mistake.

The death of Gaddafi went viral via videos posted on Facebook and other popular social media platforms. NATO intelligence was able to survey the cavalcade of vehicles of Gaddafi and his entourage, while the French Air Force bombed the procession.

Since the death of Gaddafi, Libya has become a hotbed for terrorists and is in complete chaos. Previously, Libya was one of the top nations on the African continent for quality of life. The situation also created a huge migrant crisis and there is no end in sight for Lybian nationals to have an expectation of peace.

At present, fighters led by General Khalifa Hiftar, known as the Libyan National Army (LNA), have a well-documented record of attacks on civilians, summary executions of captured fighters, and arbitrary detention. Since the conflict in the region intensified in 2014, Libya has had first three, then two, rival governments claiming legitimacy– the GNA in Tripoli, and the “Interim Government” based in the eastern cities of al-Bayda and Tobruk (allied with Hiftar).

Currently, the Islamic State has gained control of certain regions, including the late Gaddafi’s hometown of Sirte (also spelled Sirt, Surt, Sert or Syrte), located south of the Gulf of Sirte, between Tripoli and Benghazi. It is famously known for its battles, ethnic groups, and loyalism to Muammar Gaddafi.

The parallel between Libya and the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s is that both have Ronald Reagan’s imperial trajectory footprint. US President Ronald Reagan was a very skilled negotiator and a great strategist.

Russia ended up being a looser in the Libyan dictator’s death. Prior to his death, he promised to pay Russia $7 billion he owed. In 2011 Russia did not veto United Nations Security Counsel Resolution #1973, hence sanctioning the destruction of Gaddafi and Libya. There were zero opposing votes (Russia and China abstained).

The Soviet Union poured a lot of funds into Libya and had over 10,000 Soviet engineers and defense professionals stationed there, building an Air Force base and atomic station. The power play for Tripoli was a geopolitical game during the Cold War era.

Russia to this day considers Gaddaffi to be one of the world’s greatest revolutionaries, a man who built up Libya to become one of the most prosperous nations in Africa and a strong supporter of socialism. Gaddafi aligned himself with communists and his dream was to unite Arabs in the Middle East and Africa. Unfortunately, his model is now being used by the Islamic State for their sinister plan, which is as vicious as the historic Ottoman Empire.

Gaddafi’s Green Book, first published in 1975 and setting out his political philosophy, was the blueprint for transforming his utopian ideas into an actual reality in Libya. His White Book suggested how to achieve peace in the Arab world.

Just as with the Vietnam War, the Libyan War has no true winners.

One day, hopefully, there could be peace again in Libya. For now, it is in a fragile state and the Islamic State continues to be a real problem in the region. Libya’s problems are having a direct impact on Western Europe and the safety of the continent.

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Christina Kitova

I spent most of my professional life in finance, insurance risk management litigation.

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