Uganda Homosexuals to Be Killed

  • The law, popularly called ‘Kill the Gays’ was annulled five years ago because of a procedural error, but the government is now planning to re-introduce the law in the coming weeks.
  • The law, popularly called ‘Kill the Gays’ was annulled five years ago because of a procedural error, but the government is now planning to re-introduce the law in the coming weeks.
  • Homosexuality is highly frowned upon and is a taboo in most African cultures, and homosexuality is a criminal offense in most parts of the continent punishable with imprisonment or death.

Uganda wants to introduce a law that makes homosexuality punishable by a death penalty. The Ugandan government made the announcement. The new law is meant to curb what the local authorities describe as the rise of “unnatural sex” in the East African country. Human rights activists fear that the plan will encourage violence against LGBTs and transgender people.

The law, popularly called ‘Kill the Gays’ was annulled five years ago because of a procedural error, but the government is now planning to re-introduce the law in the coming weeks. The law, popularly called ‘Kill the Gays’ was annulled five years ago because of a procedural error, but the government is now planning to re-introduce the law in the coming weeks.

Uganda, officially the Republic of Uganda, is a country in East-Central Africa. It is bordered to the east by Kenya, to the north by South Sudan, to the west by the Democratic Republic of the Congo, to the south-west by Rwanda, and to the south by Tanzania. The southern part of the country includes a substantial portion of Lake Victoria, shared with Kenya and Tanzania. Uganda is in the African Great Lakes region. Uganda also lies within the Nile basin, and has a varied but generally a modified equatorial climate.

“Homosexuality is not natural for Ugandans, but there is huge recruitment going on by homosexuals in schools, especially among the youth, where they promote the lie that people are born that way,” said Simon Lokodo, the country’s Minister for Ethics and Integrity. “Our current criminal law is limited and only criminalizes the act. We want to make clear that everyone who is involved in promotion and recruitment will also be criminalized. Those who commit serious acts will receive the death penalty.“

The law, strongly supported by the nation’s President, Yoweri Museveni, will be resubmitted to parliament in the coming weeks and is expected to be voted before the end of the year, Lokodo said. He is convinced that there will be a necessary two-thirds majority to approve the law. “We have talked to MPs, and we have mobilized them in large numbers,” says the minister. “Many of them express their support.”

Taboo

Homosexuality is highly frowned upon and is a taboo in most African cultures, and homosexuality is a criminal offense in most parts of the continent punishable with imprisonment or death. Even without the death penalty, Uganda is already one of the most difficult countries in the world to be part of a sexual minority. Homosexuals are already risking life imprisonment, and the new law will, according to human rights activists, encourage violence against LGBs and transgender people.

This year, three homosexual men and a transgender woman were murdered during homophobic attacks in Uganda. Last week one homosexual man was clubbed to death. Hundreds of LGBT people were forced to leave the country as refugees, and more cases are likely to be reported when this law is introduced.

Penalties

Earlier this year, Brunei also announced that the country wanted to punish homosexuality with the death penalty. The great international outrage that ensued eventually led to the repeal of the law.

An anti-gay comment from a senior civil servant in Tanzania prompted Denmark, the second-largest donor for the East African country, to withdraw $10 million in financial support.

When Uganda tried to introduce their controversial law in 2014, the country also received a lot of criticism worldwide. The US introduced visa sanctions, canceled military exercises, and reduced financial aid. The World Bank, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and the Netherlands also suspended their financial support. But this time, Uganda is determined to introduce the law and authorities say that they will not be intimidated.

“It’s a concern,” responds Lokodo. “But we are ready. We don’t like blackmail. Although we know that this will irritate our supporters in terms of budget and governance, we cannot simply bow our heads to people who want to impose a culture that is strange to us.”

Our grassroots organization (DIGNITY NOW) is advocating for the respect of all people’s rights and ways of life. It doesn’t matter whether they are straight or LGBTs. Remember, we are all children of God. We welcome your support and views. Kindly get in touch via; dignity.now@yahoo.com.

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