A Mystery at the World’s First Religious Temple Göbekli Tepe is Solved

  • Göbekli Tepe is an archaeological site in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey approximately 12 km northeast of the city of Şanlıurfa.
  • Gobekli Tepe is the oldest known temple complex in the world.
  • A computer algorithm identified patterns.

A hidden geometric structure was found in the large-scale religious building of Göbekli Tepe, an archaeological site in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey approximately 12 km northeast of the city of Şanlıurfa. The tell has a height of 15 m and is about 300 m in diameter. It is approximately 760 m above sea level.

It proves that its builders were familiar with geometry and at least part of the structure was built on a single plan. Previously, experts believed that the builders of the object, which is six millennia older than Stonehenge, simply could not understand such abstractions.

University Professor and Archeologist Avi Gopher.

Gobekli Tepe is the oldest known temple complex in the world. It is more than 11 thousand years old. Since large-scale excavations began in 1994, it has remained the subject of research and discussion. It was built by Neolithic communities 11,500-11,000 years ago and includes huge round stone structures and monumental stone columns up to 5.5 meters high. By 10,200–88,000 BC farming communities had arisen in the Levant and spread to Asia Minor, North Africa and North Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is the site of the earliest developments of the Neolithic Revolution from around 10,000 BC.

Since there is no evidence of farming or animal domestication at that time, it is believed that the site was built by hunter-gatherers. The complex architecture is very unusual. Was the huge complex built according to a single plan, or did new buildings spontaneously appear next to the old ones? Most scientists are leaning towards the second scenario. Until now, there was almost no evidence that in such ancient times people possessed abstractions such as geometric calculations and architectural plans. It was believed that these intellectual heights were conquered only by the first farmers.

Göbekli Tepe in Turkey.

Now, researchers have used a computer algorithm to identify patterns that have so far escaped the attention of colleagues. For example, it turned out that the three central buildings form an equilateral triangle. The authors of this amazing work are graduate student Gil Hackley and Israeli archaeologist and a professor Avi Gopher from the University of Tel Aviv.

The segment forming one side of this triangle held another surprise. The entire structure is surrounded by a wall that forms an oval. The center of this oval coincides with the middle of the mentioned segment. Both ends of the segment are located from the nearest point of the outer wall at exactly the same distance as from the center of the oval.

The work is titled “Geometry and Architectural Planning at Göbekli Tepe, Turkey.”

It is clear ancient civilization understood geometry and structures. This is a great finding. The full knowledge ancient civilizations possessed pertaining to architecture still remains a great mystery.

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Christina Kitova

I spent most of my professional life in finance, insurance risk management litigation.

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