Afghanistan — Taliban Claims Responsibility for Twin Attacks

  • The first attacker, who was identified before he reached his target, detonated the explosive a few meters from the building.
  • The four officers killed in the second attack include a police commander and three of his bodyguards.
  • The Taliban militant group claimed responsibility for both attacks, calling them a "tactical attack."

At least seven police officers have been killed and in two separate attacks in Afghanistan. In one of the attacks, in Southern Kandahar province, three officers were killed and 20 others injured. In the second attack, in Nangarhar province, a landmine blast claimed the lives of four police officers.

Kandahār is one of the thirty-four provinces of Afghanistan, located in the southern part of the country next to Pakistan. The province contains about 18 districts, over 1,000 villages, and approximately 1,368,100 people, which is mostly tribal and a rural society.

The provincial governor’s spokesman, Baheer Ahmad, said the attacker, who was identified before he reached his target, detonated the explosive a few meters from the building. The four officers killed in the second attack include a police commander and three of his bodyguards. The Taliban militant group claimed responsibility for both attacks, calling them a “tactical attack.”

The twin attack comes a few days after the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) blamed the country’s military for a rocket attack that claimed 23 lives in Helmand province. It called on the government on the government to investigate the attack.

The government disputed the allegations, saying there was no military attack in the area at the time of the attack. No group claimed responsibility for the attack. The President, Ashraf Ghani, condemned the attack and called on the Taliban to end the attacks.

There has been a rise in the number of attacks from militant groups in recent days. Last month, six civilians were killed in a roadside bomb blast in the same province that left two other people wounded.

A day earlier, two members of Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHCR) were killed in a bomb attack as they headed to work. It is alleged that an explosive device was planted in their vehicle. No group claimed responsibility for the attack, but the Taliban has been blamed once more.

Another roadside bomb killed six civilians in Jawzjan province, in the northern part of the country. The Interior Ministry spokesman, Tariq Arian, confirmed the incident, and said that one person was injured in the attack. He blamed the attack on the Taliban militants, who are said to be active in parts of Jawzjan province. However, no group claimed responsibility.

The Taliban, who refer to themselves as the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan (IEA), are a Sunni Islamic fundamentalist political movement and military organization in Afghanistan currently waging war (an insurgency, or jihad) within that country. Since 2016, the Taliban’s leader is Mawlawi Hibatullah Akhundzada.

Earlier in the month, two people, including a prayer leader, were killed, and two others wounded in a bomb explosion in a mosque. A week later, four people were killed, including the prayer leader, in a bomb attack at another mosque. Both attacks were claimed by the Islamic State.

The country is set to begin peace talks for the prosperity of the country, however, the spike in the attacks could be a possible hindrance to the peace process that is being pushed by foreign leaders. The peace deal, signed in February between the Unites States and the Taliban, gives a way for the Afghan government and the Taliban to start negotiations for the best interest of the country.

The talks between the militant group and the government have delayed because of the political rivalry between the two presidential candidates after last year’s elections. However, the two leaders reached an agreement earlier in the month. The agreement between the two leaders and the release of the prisoners is seen as a major step in the commencement of the talks.

The deal also requires the Afghan government is to release 5,000 insurgents. In exchange, 1,000 Afghan soldiers and police captured by the militant group will be freed. The agreement was signed so as to pave the way for US troops to leave the country after the long military engagement.

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Juliet Norah

I am a freelance journalist is passionate about news. I derive pleasure in informing people about the happenings in the world

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