Amnesty Blames Guinea Authorities for Post-Election Violence

  • “Authorities must stop the use of firearms,” said Fabien Offner a researcher with Amnesty International.
  • The United Nation’s Secretary General Antonio Guterres also condemned the post-election violence that was experienced in the country.
  • The incumbent, Alpha Conde, won with 59.49% of the votes in the controversial polls.

The security forces in Guinea have been blamed for excessive use of force during protests against the October 18 elections. Amnesty International said that the police fired live rounds of ammunition at protesters during the unrest that claimed ten lives. The United Nations also condemned the post-election violence.

Cellou Dalein Diallo is a Guinean economist and politician who was Prime Minister of Guinea from 2004 to 2006. Previously he held a succession of ministerial posts in the government from 1996 to 2004. Currently he is President of the Union of Democratic Forces of Guinea (UFDG), an opposition party.

“Authorities must stop the use of firearms,” said Fabien Offner, a researcher with Amnesty International. “If criminal culpability is found, those suspected must be brought to justice in fair trials before civilian courts,” he added.

Amnesty also condemned the shut-down of internet and the cut off of international calls during the protest, adding that it was an attack on freedom of expression.

The United Nation’s Secretary General Antonio Guterres also condemned the post-election violence that was experienced in the country. Guterres said he was saddened by the loss of lives and destruction of property. He sent his condolences to the bereaved families and wished a speedy recovery to those who were injured in the protests.

The unrest began when the country’s opposition leader announced himself winner, and the celebration by his supporters were suppressed by security officers. The incumbent, Alpha Conde, won with 59.49% of the votes in the controversial polls, according to the country’s electoral body.

The results have been greatly contested by Guinea’s leading opposition politician, Cellou Dalein Diallo, who claimed the victory. The opposition leader said he will be headed to court to contest the win, adding that he had gathered evidence of fraud.

Diallo is a former Prime Minister who has been Conde’s runner up in the 2010 and 2015 general elections. The country has experienced numerous protests since the constitution was amended to accommodate President Conde’s bid for a third term as president.

Alpha Condé is a Guinean politician who has been President of Guinea since December 2010. He spent decades in opposition before he became the first freely elected president in the country’s history.

This will be Conde’s third term in office. He has, over the years, been against a set limit for the number of times a president runs for the office, terming it very unfair. In March, the president passed a referendum that allowed him to vie for another term. The controversial poll led to the death of at least 30 people, and was marred by protests.

The opposition staged protests with an aim of stopping the polls to no avail. Despite a boycott by the group, the polls went on as scheduled. The constitutional amendment allowed for an extension of the presidential term limit to six years, from the earlier five years.

This is not a new phenomenon in the continent of Africa. The heads of states have always had a thirst to stay in power long after their terms of service expire. Most of these African leaders have strived to change their constitutions so that it favors their moves to seek more terms as presidents.

Conde is the country’s first democratically elected president. He took over power in 2010 for his first term, and was re-elected in 2015. His election was considered a milestone, but analysts have argued that he has not done so much for the country despite facing the wrath of the previous regime.

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Juliet Norah

I am a freelance journalist is passionate about news. I derive pleasure in informing people about the happenings in the world

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