At Least 35 Dead as Typhoon Hagibis, Earthquake Strike Japan

  • The typhoon is reportedly the worst storm in Japan in 60 years.
  • The storm has affected the nation's major power supplies, and at least 376,000 homes have been left without electricity.
  • Simultaneously with the severe weather Saturday night, a 5.7 magnitude earthquake struck Tokyo.

At least 35 people have died, and several others have gone missing following typhoon Hagibis’ ravages in Japan. The infrastructure damage is significant as rivers have flooded and cities submerged. Hundreds of thousands have been left without power.

Typhoon Hagibis was a large and powerful tropical cyclone that was considered to be the most devastating typhoon to hit the Kantō region of Japan since Typhoon Ida in 1958. Hagibis caused additional impacts in Japan, after Faxai struck the same region one month prior.

The typhoon is reportedly the worst storm in Japan in 60 years. The typhoon struck in the morning hours Saturday, accompanied by heavy winds and heavy rain, causing extensive devastation, landslides, and storms. At most, more than 7 million people have since been urged to evacuate from the most vulnerable areas.

Different sources indicate different numbers of fatalities in the natural disaster, and the number is most likely to increase as search operations are still ongoing. Over a hundred people have sustained injuries following the storm. Among the missing are parts of the crew on a cargo ship that sank in the port of Tokyo.

Boats and Helicopters

The storm has affected the nation’s major power supplies, and at least 376,000 homes have been left without electricity, while 14,000 households are lacking water, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said. Helicopters and boats are being used to rescue people from areas hit by landslides.

More than 13,500 had sought refuge in safer places following the Typhoon. Many stores were emptied of goods as people had secured supplies in advance. “I evacuated because my roof was ripped off by the other Typhoon and rain came in. I’m so worried about my house,” a 93-year-old man told news reporters.

Excess Rainfall

Hagibis had wind gusts of up to 60 meters per second before the Typhoon hit the land. The wind speeds were well above what qualifies as a hurricane in the Atlantic. The extreme rainfall is described as the biggest ever in the affected areas.

Typhoon Faxai was the first typhoon to strike the Kantō region since Mindulle in 2016, and the strongest typhoon to hit the region since Ma-on in 2004. Three people were killed and 147 others were injured.

Several hours before the worst of the storm hit land, the first death victim was recorded in Chiba, east of Tokyo. The man who was killed was driving a small truck. It was thrown around by a tornado that arose as the Typhoon approached. He was taken to hospital but declared dead on arrival. Chiba was also hit by a powerful typhoon in September.

Earthquakes Created Fear

Heavy rainfall submerged roads, and rivers were made to overflow as Typhoon Hagibis ravaged Japan’s capital. A man in his 60s was found dead from his flooded house in Kawasaki, near Tokyo. Yet another man was killed when a landslide hit two houses east of the country, according to Reuters news agency. Simultaneously with the severe weather Saturday night, a 5.7 magnitude earthquake struck Tokyo.

Several rivers in the area were overflowing, including the Tama River that flows through residential areas in Tokyo. Among the missing are three people who were in a car on a bridge that erupted over the Chikuma River. Tokyo, with its neighboring towns of Kawasaki and Yokohama, is among the largest interconnected urban areas in the world, with about 36 million inhabitants.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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