Belarus — Tikhanovskaya Gives Lukashenko Deadline to Resign

  • The Belarusian opposition leader currently exiled in neighboring Lithuania also wants all ”political prisoners” in the country released with an immediate effect.
  • Last Sunday, the demonstrators returned to the streets of Belarus, with a big concentration in the country’s capital, Minsk.
  • On Monday, the Belarusian Ministry of the Interior warned that the police will resort “if necessary” to live bullets and “special equipment” to stop anti-government protests.

On Tuesday, Belarusian opposition leader Svetlana Tikhanovskaya gave President Alexander Lukashenko a deadline to resign by October 25. Otherwise, she would mobilize the opposition members in the country to embark on a series of massive demonstrations that would paralyze activities and bring the country to a standstill.

Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya is a Belarusian activist and candidate in the 2020 Belarusian presidential election. She is married to arrested YouTuber, blogger, and activist Siarhei Tsikhanouski.

The Belarusian opposition leader currently exiled in neighboring Lithuania also wants all ”political prisoners” in the country released with an immediate effect.

Unless Lukashenko announces his resignation, halts violence and releases political prisoners, “on Oct. 26, all enterprises will begin a strike, all roads will be blocked, state-owned stores will no longer have any sales,” Tsikhanouskaya said in a statement.

The Belarusian opposition has always maintained that Lukashenko rigged the country’s recently-held elections and must vacate office to pave way for a fresh election in the Eastern European nation.

As a result, protests have been ongoing in Belarus since the announcement of the results of the disputed presidential elections on 9 August, which gave Lukasheno, in power for 26 years, a sixth term in office by a “landslide win.”

The Belarusian election is also disputed by a number of Western states, as well as the European Union. The protests by the hundreds of thousands of Belarusians have, however, been marked by strong and violent repression by the Belarusian security forces in a desperate struggle to halt them and keep Lukashenko in office.

As a result, many of the protest movement’s main figures have either sought exile abroad or have been detained. “We have said more than a few times that we are ready for dialogue and negotiations. But holding talks [with opponents] behind bars is not a dialogue,”she said on Tuesday.

The 2020 Belarusian protests, nicknamed the Slipper Revolution and the Anti-Cockroach Revolution, are a series of ongoing political demonstrations against the regime of Belarusian president Alexander Lukashenko. The demonstrations, part of the Belarusian democracy movement, started occurring in the lead-up to and during the 2020 Belarusian presidential election, in which Lukashenko sought a sixth term in office.

“Everyone who has not yet made the decision to switch to the side of the people is an accessory to terror. Declare publicly that you no longer support the regime,” she added, in what many consider her strongest statement to date.

Last Sunday, the demonstrators returned to the streets of Belarus, with a big concentration in the country’s capital, Minsk, to challenge President Alexander Lukashenko’s reelection.

More than 700 people were detained by security forces during the protests, in what has been the toughest police repression in weeks of protests, according to local human rights activists.

On Sunday in Minsk, the police tried to disperse the protesters with jets of water, stun grenades, and batons in order to prevent groups of people, who were in different places of the city, to join a major demonstration.

The Belarusian human rights group Viasna estimates that about 100,000 people participated in the Sunday demonstration in Minsk.

On Monday, the Belarusian Ministry of the Interior warned that the police will resort “if necessary” to live bullets and “special equipment” to stop anti-government protests. At the same time, they argued that the protest in the country is organized and radicalized.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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