Boris Johnson- UK Will Still Move on Even With No Brexit Deal

  • “I don’t want the Australian-WTO type outcome, particularly, but we can more than live with it.”
  • The United Kingdom officially left the European Union 31 January but the EU rules are still effective until 31 December.
  • “There is no question that the EU needs to understand that we’re utterly serious about needing to control our own laws and our own regulations.

The British Prime Minister said today that the UK could “live very well” if the post-‘Brexit ‘negotiations, underway with the European Union fail to yield an agreement before the end of the transition period. Appearing in an interview with the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show, Mr Johnson said: “I think it’s there to be done. Alas, there are some difficult issues that need to be fixed.

Boris Johnson and Ursula von der Leyen, seen here before the coronavirus pandemic, have agreed to speak on a regular basis.

All we’re asking our friends and partners to offer is terms that they’ve already offered to Canada which is you know a long way away from here.

“We’re very close to our European friends and partners, we’ve been members of the EU for 45 years, I see no reason why we shouldn’t get those sorts of terms.”

He added: “I don’t want the Australian-WTO type outcome, particularly, but we can more than live with it.”

The United Kingdom officially left the European Union (EU on 31 January but the EU rules are still effective therein until 31 December.

In case a trade deal isn’t achieved?

If the concerned parties do not settle on a trade deal, the UK would have to trade with the EU on WTO rules. In that case, the EU would impose its tariffs on imported UK goods.

This would have a big impact on UK businesses selling their goods to the EU with potentially disastrous consequences for the British economy already weakened by the new coronavirus pandemic.

This statement by Johnson comes after the premier agreed on Saturday with European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen that London and Brussels should step up their negotiations, which remained at an impasse at the end of the ninth discussion session this week, despite the fact that the deadline is around the corner.

Boris Johnson did, in fact, set at the next European summit on 15 October the deadline for an agreement to be found and implemented by the end of the year.

European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen.

The British premier still considers it possible that the two parties would reach a compromise, but stressed that there are still “many issues to be solved.”

“There is no question that the EU needs to understand that we’re utterly serious about needing to control our own laws and our own regulations.

“And similarly they need to understand that the repatriation of the UK’s fisheries which were lost in 1973 is very important.”The timing of the return to negotiations is not yet clear.

Saturday’s shared mutual commitment by Mr Johnson and Ms von der Leyen to convince their respective negotiators to try and strike an agreement in as far as the negotiations are concerned could pave the way for both parties to compromise on the outstanding differences and finally mutually reach a deal.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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