Burkina Faso: 24 Troops Killed, Several Wounded in a Deadly Attack by Terror Group

In a deadly attack that shook the West African nation yesterday, 24 of its troops were killed, seven seriously wounded and five are still missing. The attack that was carried out on a military base in northern Burkina Faso on Monday is the deadliest ever suffered by the Burkinabe army in its confrontation with jihadist groups since 2015. The opposition has since called on the resignation of the country’s current government citing incompetence and failure to safeguard the nation from external attacks.

Former Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir Accused of Receiving Millions from Saudi Arabia

Former Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir, who had been in power for nearly thirty years, appeared in court in Khartoum, the capital, on charges of corruption and killing. A Sudanese prosecutor said in June that millions of dollars of foreign currency were found in sandbags at Mr. Bashir’s home. He faces other charges. Mr. Bashir’s lawyers dismiss the charges against him as unfounded.

Zimbabwe: Police, Opposition Demonstrators Clash in Capital

Zimbabwean Police armed with tear gas and clubs today clashed with the opposition party’s protesters in the country’s capital city Harare after the protesters went ahead with their planned demonstrations despite the previous ban on their protests by the government. Supporters of Zimbabwe’s main opposition political party, the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC), sang songs condemning the police brutality while the police dispersed them with tear gas. At one instance, police surrounded a group of protesters and beat them mercilessly with clubs. A woman was later on seen being evacuated in a Red Cross ambulance.

Over 500 Migrants Stranded in the Mediterranean Sea – No Port Willing to Let Them Dock

The Norwegian ship Ocean Viking saved another 105 migrants from Libya on Monday. There are a total of 356 people on board. At the same time, 150 migrants remain “trapped” on the Spanish Open Arms ship near the Italian island of Lampedusa. Italian Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini has ordered all  Italian ports closed for refugees and illegal migrants. Meanwhile, some migrants have reportedly been waiting on ships for over ten days.

Temporary Libyan Ceasefire Broken After Mitiga International Airport Missile Attack

The UN-brokered temporary cease-fire in Libya did not last long. The parties involved in the Libyan war agreed to end the war temporarily in the capital of Tripoli. Released news said several rockets have been fired at Mitiga International Airport. The Libyan government’s army, as well as the forces affiliated with General Khalifa Khostar, accused each other of violating the ceasefire. According to officials at the Airport, all flights were canceled but the airport reopened after maintenance and cleaning.

Tunisia: Nearly 100 Presidential Candidates to Square Off in the Polls

Nearly 100 presidential candidates have filed their candidacy for the presidential election anticipated in Tunisia in the hope of succeeding Beji Caid Essebsi, the first democratically elected head of state following the Arab Spring country. In total, the names of 98 applicants interested in competing in the presidential election were recorded by the closing of registrations today. This was officially confirmed by the country’s Election commision (Isie).

Tunisian Ennahda Nominates Abdelfattah Mourou for Presidential Elections

Tunisia’s Ennahda has decided to nominate Abdel Fattah Mourou to run in early presidential elections. The decision to nominate Mourou, deputy leader of the movement, was made at a meeting of the group’s consultative council Tuesday evening. The elections are expected to be held on September 15. He was invited after the death of President Baji Kaid Essebsi last month.

Haftar Airstrike Leaves 43 Dead In Southern Libya

At least 43 people have died and more than 60 have been injured in an aerial bombardment against the city of Al Murzuq (southwest of Libya) executed by the forces led by Marshal Khalifa Haftar, a local strong man, as reported by news sources citing a representative of the city council.  Haftar’s forces, based in eastern Libya, say they targeted the city on Sunday evening but denied targeting civilians.

“It’s a Conspiracy Against Me” – South Africa’s Jacob Zuma Rejects Allegations of Crimes

In court testimony, Former South African President Jacob Zuma rejects allegations of crimes and claims to be the target of conspiracies to get him out of the picture. He is accused of corruption and involvement with entrepreneurs who had an influence in his government. Zuma denied a number of accusations against him on Monday. He said that for years he has been the target of conspiracies and attempts to destroy his reputation.

Sudan Crisis: Ruling Military Foils Coup Attempt

Sudan’s ruling transitional military has foiled a “coup attempt” aimed at “blocking the deal” with opposition representatives. The head of the Security Committee Council, Jamal Omar Ibrahim, said that a number of officers and soldiers has been arrested.

The announcement of the attempted coup failed after the agreement of the military council and opposition representatives to end the political deadlock in the country. Ibrahim said that 12 officers were arrested, including seven in service and five in pensions and four officers were detained.

Bosco Ntaganda: Congolese Ex-Rebel Chief Convicted of War Crimes

Today, the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague has condemned a Congolese rebel commander Bosco Ntaganda for crimes against humanity and war crimes. Known as the “Terminator,” Ntaganda was charged for his role in atrocities in an ethnic conflict from 2002 to 2003.

The ICC found him guilty on all 18 charges. These included cruel massacres, the use of child soldiers and sexual enslavement of young girls. Bosco Ntaganda asserted his innocence during the trial. When Judge Robert Fremr announced the verdict, he showed no emotion. The sentence is to be announced at a later meeting – Ntaganda faces a life sentence.

Military, Civilians Reach Agreement in Sudan; Cautious Optimism Reigns

A power-sharing agreement was reached Friday between Sudan’s military government and civilian opposition, bringing an end to the month-long standoff between the two sides, and the best bit of news in nearly 30 years.  The country will be controlled by a joint sovereign council until elections can be held in three years and three months.  The preliminary deal also includes the promise of an independent investigation into the June 3 massacre, in which 100 protesters were killed.  The opposition, and its supporters, were jubilant, but cautious.

Tunisia: One Policeman Killed, 8 Wounded in Two Suicide Bombings in Tunis

This double attack testifies to the resilience of certain terrorist groups in Tunisia, despite a general improvement in the security situation.

A policeman was killed and eight others injured in Tunis on Thursday (June 27th) in two different attacks in the city center and in front of a barracks of the National Guard, incidents testifying to the resilience of certain terrorist groups in Tunisia despite a general improvement of the security situation.

Unrest Around the World – A Country by Country Look

Today following the world news can be seen in a world at unrest.  In these countries especially is apparent World Unrest:

Khazakhstan – The world’s largest land locked country and the ninth largest in the world with an area of 2,724,900 square kilometers. It is a democratic secular republic with a diverse heritage. After the elections resulting in the overwhelming victory of interim president Toqaev began wave of protests against the lack of fairness in the elections.

South African Elections Roundup: Reduced Majority, Surprising Results

By Friday, the Independent Electoral Commission had finished counting the ballots in South Africa’s sixth general election since the end of Apartheid. As expected, the African National Congress extended their quarter-century in power with a substantial, yet reduced, majority. What was not expected was both the extent of their reduction, and the subpar performance of at least one opposition party. The new National Assembly will present a fresh set of challenges to President Cyril Ramaphosa and his reform agenda.

South Africans Go to the Polls This Week; a Majority Will Stay Away

In political science, a democratic transition is said to have been completed once at least two parties win elections. If that’s the case, the end of Apartheid twenty-five years ago merely marked the replacement of one dominant-party state by another. Since vanquishing the National Party— and white minority rule— in 1994, the African National Congress has won five consecutive elections, and governed alone. On Wednesday, the ANC will make it six in a row, and a full term for South Africa’s new President, Cyril Ramaphosa.