Hong Kong Police Arrest More as “Lady Liberty” Looks On

Hong Kong police carried out new arrests during protests on Sunday, organized in different neighborhoods by pro-democracy protesters. Security forces stormed a shopping center which protesters had vandalized for supporting the pro-Beijing Hong Kong government. On the other hand, a group of protesters secretly transported a statue that became a symbol of their mobilization on top of an emblematic mountain of the ex-British colony, the “Lion Rock” (495 meters), which dominates the peninsula from Kowloon.

Hong Kong Protests Continue, Sit-in Begins Saturday

The theme of Saturday’s protests in Hong Kong was to oppose the use of the Emergency Law by the Hong Kong Government, and the enactment of the Anti-Mask Law. Even though the new law has been in force for a week, at least 90 people have been arrested or accused, so far. Most people still wear masks to protest, however. Some people shouted slogans such as “masked no guilty, legislation is unreasonable”, “I have the right to wear a mask”, and “Hong Kong people resist.”

Big Trouble in Big China— NBA Storm Intensifies

All Chinese companies have suspended their cooperation with the NBA in the wake of a controversial tweet from one of the association’s general managers. However, Thursday’s game between the Los Angeles Lakers and Brooklyn Nets in Shanghai went on as scheduled, and Saturday’s game between the two teams in Shenzhen will continue as usual as well. At the same time, the attitude of this incident on the Chinese network is one-sided.

Chinese Soldiers in Hong Kong Issue Warning to Protesters

Chinese troops stationed in Hong Kong warned protesters on Sunday when they shone a laser at a garrison in the city, according to Reuters. This was the first direct confrontation between Hong Kong protesters and military forces from the mainland in four months of anti-government protests. The People’s Liberation Army (PLA) garrison stationed in Kowloon District, Hong Kong, warned a crowd of several hundred protesters that they might be arrested for shining laser lights on soldiers and garrison.

Hong Kong Court Rejects Challenge to Mask Ban— Protesters Return in Masks

Tens of thousands of protesters flooded Hong Kong Sunday against a ban on wearing masks in public. Hong Kong’s Supreme Court dismissed a challenge to the ban by pro-democracy legislators. The ban, decreed by Chief Executive Carrie Lam, came into effect on Saturday in an apparent bid to halt the protests that have been going on for four months. Instead, the move has sparked even more clashes and destruction over the last two days in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory.

Hong Kong: Protests Scheduled Before Chinese National Day

Pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong have set themselves a busy schedule for Saturday, Sept. 28, according to Reuters. These schedules include restoring the “Lennon Walls” and celebrating the fifth anniversary of the Golden Umbrella movement. Thousands of protesters gathered in the harbor area on Friday, chanting slogans accusing police brutality of protesters for more than three months of unrest in Hong Kong.

Chinese Foreign Minister: China Has No Intention of Playing “The Game of Thrones”

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi retaliated against US criticism of Beijing’s trade and development model on Tuesday, saying that Beijing has no intention to “play the Game of Thrones on the world stage.” He also warned Washington to respect China’s sovereignty, including on the Hong Kong issue. The Chinese Foreign Minister and State Councilor said that Beijing will not succumb to threats, including on trade. However, he also expressed the hope that a round of high-level trade negotiations next month will produce positive results.

China and Russia Have a Sinister Plan for Hong Kong and the Demonstrators

Russian media continues to run pro-China propaganda and justifications for the use of force against demonstrators in Hong Kong. The unrest in the former British colony has been ongoing for the past four months. Demonstrators wearing black face masks became the new heroes and modern day revolutionaries, protesting against China’s brutal arrest and prosecution system.

Protests in Hong Kong Again Turn Violent

Security officials blocked the way for protesters in Hong Kong. They began to erect barricades from bamboo scaffolding and street iron partitions. Near the police station building, the confrontation continued for several hours, until the demonstrators began to throw stones, bricks and water bottles at the police. The police used tear gas, rubber bullets, and began to detain the protesters, beating them with batons.

With Hong Kong in Turmoil, China Upgrades Shenzhen’s Status

Hong Kong broke out again in “reverse delivery” protests Friday, opposing the now-withdrawn extradition bill to mainland China, and demanding democracy in the city. The organizers said that the number of people participating in a human chain reached 1.7 million. On the same day, Shenzhen, a mainland Chinese city adjacent to Hong Kong, received a “birthday gift”– the Chinese government issued a plan to build Shenzhen into a pilot demonstration area for socialism with Chinese characteristics.

Hong Kong Local Government Prepared to Negotiate with Protesters

Following a demonstration in Hong Kong, government head Carrie Lam spoke of her readiness to talk to the protesters.  The protests in Hong Kong prompted the local government to withdraw. Lam says she is ready to negotiate with the protesters to get out of the political crisis and find a comprehensive solution. She believes her offer is a turning point in the crisis and expressed hope that dialogue with the protesters could provide grounds for restoring peace to Hong Kong.

Chinese Troops Not Needed to Cope with Hong Kong Protests

Tensions in Hong Kong are still rising, but the Hong Kong police said that although they are in a state of anxiety, they do not need assistance from the Chinese authorities and Chinese troops will never take action in Hong Kong. Over the past few months, Hong Kong has held a call for democratic reforms. The protesters have changed their strategies. At the same time, they have responded to multiple targets and the Hong Kong police have been struggling.

EU Warns Hong Kong Ahead of ‘Million March’

Protests continue in Hong Kong after ten weeks and could swell to a “million march” on Sunday. The EU has warned the Hong Kong government not to undermine the legal rights of protesting citizens. While China has not ruled out military intervention in Hong Kong, protests continue in the former British colony against local government and Beijing’s interference in domestic affairs.

China Has No Plans to Forcefully End Protests in Hong Kong

China has announced that it has no plans to forcefully end the protests in Hong Kong, but it will not be ruled out if necessary. China has said that if the Hong Kong executive government fails to bring peace, then China will intervene. Satellite imagery, which has been widely shared on social networks, indicates an increase in China’s military presence in the border town of Shenzhen. The pictures show dozens of Chinese police and military vehicles in the grounds of a sports stadium.

Hong Kong Protests – Can Chinese Economy Survive?

Hong Kong is presently experiencing a political crisis. Large scale use of law enforcement and military is being used to disperse the protesters. However, the system itself is failing and it will lead to additional protests. Historically, an achievement of the Freudo-Marxists was the quantum leap through the rationalistic outlook which had dominated in the Marxist tradition. Furthermore, the escalation of the crisis in Hong Kong is inevitable due to the bygone times and political reality of the Chinese territory.

Hong Kong Protests: City Plays Damage Control, Beijing Ratchets Up the Rhetoric

A day after massive anti-government protests effectively shut down one of the busiest airports in the world, life in Hong Kong had still not returned to normal.  Hundreds more flights were cancelled Tuesday at Hong Kong International Airport, which was still dealing with the effects of the sit-in.  The local authorities defended both the use of plainclothes policemen and their tactics, which viral videos showed turning violent over the weekend and into Monday.  The protests, which have gone on for more than two months, after an extradition bill to mainland China was pulled, show no sign of slowing down.  Meanwhile, Beijing ratcheted up the rhetoric, but remained at the gates.  Waiting.

Hong Kong Demonstrations: Now Airport Closed, All Flights Canceled

The Hong Kong airport authorities canceled all their flights after thousands of protesters occupied the city’s international airport terminal for the fourth consecutive day. The airport authority attributed the cancellations, which affected all flights after 4 pm local time (08.00 GMT) today to; “a large number of protesters that prevented passengers from checking-in” and have “seriously interrupted” the service.

Hong Kong Protests: All flights to Hong Kong International Airport Canceled

Hong Kong International Airport canceled all flights on Monday as the fourth day of protests at the airport’s main terminal continued. The Airport is one of the busiest in East Asia and the world. Thousands of protesters started rallying at the airport’s entrance and exit lounges four days ago trying to make their protest heard around the world.

General Strike in Hong Kong; Beijing Waits, for Now

Hong Kongers from all walks of life, and seven districts of the city, took to the streets Monday as part of a general strike, the largest such demonstration since 1967.  Teachers and students, aviation workers, finance employees, and civil servants took part in the protests, aimed at both Hong Kong’s pro-Beijing government and mainland China itself.  What initially began as a row over a now-suspended extradition bill has morphed in to a movement against Chinese encroachment, Hong Kong’s non-democratic system, and its unaccountable police force.  Now in their ninth week, and showing no signs of slowing down, some fear Beijing may be compelled to act.

Hong Kong’s Mong Kok Parade Countered by Pro Police Rally

Even with Hong Kong’s “Fugitive Offenders Ordinance” amended, the dispute-related demonstrations continued. The group opposed to the amendments held a parade in Kowloon on Saturday. Another group was on the Hong Kong Island across the sea with the title “Hope for Tomorrow,” holding a rally in support of police enforcement. The conference said that about 90,000 people attended the meeting. The police said that the number of people gathered at the peak was about 26,000.