China Roundup – Crackdown on Overeating, TikTok Parent Fighting Back, Student May Get Kicked Out of Uni for Dog Abuse

  • ByteDance presses charge on Trump administration.
  • In similar cases involving animal abuses by students, all the universities have decided to dismiss them.
  • Many are expecting that Huayi Brothers will go bankruptcy soon if no further investors are willing to help them.

On August 22, a 15-year-old girl jumped off a 25-floor building in Sichuan and fell on her father, who was trying to catch her. Both passed away later in the hospital. According to a witness, the mother of the girl was in the elevator to the roof at that moment. For now, there are two speculations over the cause on the internet. One says that she didn’t want to take more piano classes and that the classroom is in fact in the same building, while the other claims that the girl had been depressed for a long time and she had a history of self-harm. Local police reported the case and pleaded for people to stop circulating related videos out of respect.

ByteDance decided to sue the US government over TikTok case.

ByteDance has confirmed on August 24 that they will sue the American government over Trump’s Executive Order concerning TikTok: “For almost a year, we sincerely seek to communicate with the US government, offering solutions for their concerns. But the US government ignores the facts and does not follow legal procedures. They even force themselves in commercial negotiations. To guarantee a fair treat for the company and the users, we officially announce that we will press charge on August 24.” Also, the parent company of TikTok is actively preparing for a possible termination of its business in the states.

On Weibo, a video showing a man brutally kicking and beating a dog has sparked rages online. According to Mrs. Xie, the man in the video is the son of a friend of her mother-in-law, who stayed for several days in her house before beginning his master study in Fuzhou University.

Xie claimed that the man had abused the dog many times, but her husband let her be discreet about it for fear of harming the young man’s reputation. People on Weibo rushed to the official account of Fuzhou University to ask them to expel the student. In similar cases involving animal abuses by students, all the universities have decided to dismiss them.

Once censored movie The Eight Hundred finally got released in China.

The China Central Television has criticized the Mukbang a third time this month. Mukbang, or Chibo in Chinese, consists of streaming people consuming a large quantity of food while interacting with the audience. On Zhihu, many posts explain that the criticism should not be interpreted literally. They point out that this is a warning of potential food crisis in China in the future.

Huayi Brothers, one of China’s biggest entertainment companies, requires cinemas to pay in advance a “guarantee fee” regardless of the box office before giving them the password to The Eight Hundred, the first and only new movie after the lockdown. The unfair terms have enraged lots of small cinema chains, some threatening to not present the movie. The bold move by Huayi Brothers could be a result of its recent loss due to the lockdown. Many are expecting that Huayi Brothers will go bankruptcy soon if no further investors are willing to help them.

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