Christianity and the Need for Social Change Amidst of Globalization and Hunger: What’s Next!!

  • As a body of Christ in a world filled with dynamic social changes, how have we prepared for the transformation taking place around us?
  • Christianity will survive it if we play our part in policy engagements around the world.
  • According to New World Wealth, 7 of the 10 wealthiest countries ranked by the number of millionaires are "Christian dominated."

The present state of the Global Church.

For centuries, the world has continuously been on the struggle to confronting a well-known enemy that has grown so big in our presence, which, as a result, has cost the deaths of many globally, homelessness, fear, anxiety, insecurity, and notably crime. That enemy is poverty. Poverty has been the very topic on the lips of billions worldwide, people of all categories, including the Church. It is an enemy that has become a constant threat to our communities. Our coeval esoteric culture has tried to implement specific changes in people’s living expectancy around the world. There has never been a time that Christianity has gone through so much tyrannical persecution since the dawn of the 21st century over Social Issues, Economic Problems, Public Policy Problems, Racial Intolerance, and Poverty.

The reality of Globalization

Globalization is the tip of today’s business by which every organization must learn to develop their willingness to perform at the highest stage. As a body of Christ in a world filled with dynamic social changes, how have we prepared for the transformation taking place around us? Jesus said in Matthew 24:44, “To watch and pray.” In context, what Christ was saying in that text is to spend enough time telling his return and not stimulating prediction and analyzing what date it will be, but to warn his followers to be prepared. My Christian faith growth has shown our level of inconsistency among many of our faith leaders worldwide. Two important commandments were given in the text of Matthew 24; the second aspect is seen in verse 45-47, also state that as a Church, the time of waiting must be spent on taking care of his people (the poor) among us and doing his work on earth both with the Church and outside of the usual gathering.

Few conversations have emerged from the Church on the issues of globalization.

The fight against Poverty and Global Hunger

Few conversations have emerged from the Church on the issues of globalization. Christianity will survive it if we play our part in policy engagements around the world. It should also interest you as a Christian leader that the more you engage in community interaction, you will know what sorts of winds are blowing around you. At the turn of every century, it is paramount for the world to go through a paradigm shift in religion, economic, and politics; the world cannot survive with the cooperation of these three important elements in modern civilization. The Church must begin to see herself as one of globalization’s most significant organ because we have an important population of 3.2 billion Christians worldwide. We hold it a responsibility to cater to their welfare and the well-being of non-Christians alike. The acronym word “brother’s keeper” was borrowed from Genesis 4:9.

The next question here is, how does Christianity respond to some of the challenges of poverty, unemployment, and wealth creation? All these issues will continue to pollute our biblical theology of who is my “neighbor.” Each has a fundamental role they must play in other to have a drastic change in the world’s population. According to CNBC (Jan 14, 2015), it was reported in “The study, from the nonpartisan wealth research firm New World Wealth, found that of the 13.1 million millionaires in the world, 7.4 million, or 56.2 percent, identify themselves as Christian when asked about their religion. 6.5 percent of millionaires identified themselves as Muslims, 3.9 percent identified themselves as Hindu, and 1.7 percent identified themselves as Jewish. The rest 31.7 percent of millionaires identified themselves as “other,” including other religions and “no religion.” Of course, the richest countries are also Christian-dominant. Hence, countries play a vital role in the results. According to New World Wealth, 7 of the 10 wealthiest countries ranked by the number of millionaires are “Christian dominated,” according to the report.”

Summary

It must be on record that poverty is still thriving within Christianity, either because our wealth is not adequately channeled towards expected demands or those resources that are not just enough due to the insurmountable demands of those needs. The level of poverty among the third world Christian nations is incredibly high, even in the United States. Some certain aspects of poverty have been neglected as we can see the increasing cases of Africans, Latin, and Asian Arabs Christians. We can see many of these cases among the few Caucasian Christians of rural settlements of Europe and America. If we are true Disciples of Christ, what hinders us from eradicating poverty among Christians in the world? Until many of our Christian leaders gets more involved with the act of charity and social developmental agendas to foster empowerment and job creation, the discussion of globalization and the Church will be miles apart. The time to act is now. The rich should support the Church, while the Church must be honest enough to help her communities with every resource given to fight and eradicate poverty worldwide. No Christian and non-Christians alike must go to bed hungry and homeless.

Only $1/click

Submit Your Ad Here

Babajide J. Asaju

Babajide J. Asaju is a Nigerian pentecostal preacher and scholar. (B. SC, Hons) Public Administration, from the University of Ado Ekiti, (M.A. Religion, M.A. Christian Leadership) Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary, (MBA) Apsley Business School, London, UK. Public Policy Economics, from the University of Oxford, UK.

Leave a Reply