Coronavirus: Britain’s Boris Back to Work

  • On the 26th, Prime Minister Johnson returned from the official residence of the prime minister, Chequers, to Downing Street.
  • Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab praised the ministers and civil servants who "acted positively" during the absence of the Prime Minister.
  • Opposition parties are celebrating Mr. Johnson's recovery and asking for detailed explanations on how to remove the lockdown if it is deemed safe.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has returned to work today. Johnson had been treated for more than two weeks after contracting COVID-19, caused by the new coronavirus. Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab, who was acting as prime minister, said Johnson’s return would be an impetus for Britain.

Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson is a British politician, writer, and former journalist serving as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and Leader of the Conservative Party since 2019. He was Foreign Secretary from 2016 to 2018 and Mayor of London from 2008 to 2016.

Johnson was infected with the new virus at the end of March. He continued his public affairs while being isolated from the prime minister’s residence, but was admitted to a hospital in London on April 5. Johnson eventually wound up in intensive care (ICU) and received oxygen. He was discharged from the hospital after 12 days. On the 26th, Prime Minister Johnson returned from the official residence of the prime minister, Chequers, to Downing Street.

After returning to office, he will attend the new coronavirus conference on the morning of the 27th. It is not known if he will appear in regular meetings. Johnson said he had a telephone conversation with Queen Elizabeth and US President Donald Trump last week. He has also begun discussing new coronavirus measures with cabinet ministers, including Mr. Raab and Chancellor of the Exchequer, Rishi Sunak.

Foreign Secretary Raab praised the ministers and civil servants who “acted positively” during the absence of the Prime Minister. Raab said he “did not enjoy” acting as Prime Minister. Instead, he was always thinking about Johnson and his family, especially when he was in a “dangerous situation.”

In the UK, more than 20,000 people have died in hospitals due to the new coronavirus, according to data released on April 26th. It is the fifth-highest number of deaths by country in the world, but it does not include those who died at home or in nursing homes. Prime Minister Johnson has been criticized for responding too late since the threat of COVID-19 was revealed. The opposition Labour Party and the Liberal Democrats have urged that a public investigation should be done on the “disastrous” mortality rate.

Dominic Rennie Raab is a British politician serving as First Secretary of State and Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs since July 2019. A member of the Conservative Party, he has also been the Member of Parliament (MP) for Esher and Walton since 2010.

In this regard, Foreign Secretary Raab defended the government’s response, while saying that the number of 20,000 was a “difficult passage point.” He pointed out that the number of deaths would have been higher if the government did not make major decisions at the appropriate time in accordance with scientific advice. In terms of lack of protective equipment for health care workers, the United Kingdom is doing its best, but not what it wants. It is “selected as the buyer in the international market” amid the lack of protective equipment worldwide.

Opposition parties are celebrating Mr. Johnson’s recovery and asking for detailed explanations on how to remove the lockdown if it is deemed safe. Rachel Reeves, Labour’s Shadow Chancellor, rejected the idea of pitching a rival plan. “We want the government to publish its plan so we can scrutinize it,” she said. “We want to work with the government in bringing forward a plan and then getting that right.”

Andy Burnham, a former Labour Party minister and Mayor of Greater Manchester, also said on a Sky program that some companies, including retailers, would be strict about keeping more than two meters away from others. Has suggested that it should be allowed to resume operations. He then explained that such a “standards-led” approach should be pursued by the Health and Safety Executive.

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Benedict Kasigara

I have been working as a freelance editor/writer since 2006. My specialist subject is film and television having worked for over 10 years from 2005 during which time I was the editor of the BFI Film and Television.

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