Coronavirus — India Coping with Unlock 1.0

  • By the time you are reading this news, people from all over India have left their homes and gone to work.
  • The Coronavirus has slowly infected about thousands of people in India and has claimed the lives of more than 5,000 people.
  • The question arises as to how well prepared the system of government and private institutions fighting the Coronavirus in India’s cities and villages are.

The Indian government started removing its nationwide lockdown on Monday. Crowds are likely to gather at places like temples, mosques, and shopping-malls from the second week after traffic became normal in the first week of this month. However, the lockdown will continue in the places declared as containment zones.

The first case of the COVID-19 pandemic in India was reported on 30 January 2020, originating from China. As of 2 June 2020, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare have confirmed a total of 198,706 cases, 95,527 recoveries (including 1 migration) and 5,598 deaths in the country.

By the time you are reading this news, people from all over India have left their homes and gone to work. Merchants are scouring the dust in their shops for weeks, and job seekers are getting ready to go to the office. During this time, however, millions of migrant workers have suffered the most.

The Coronavirus has slowly infected thousands of people in India, and has claimed the lives of more than 5,000 people. News is coming that the virus, which was on the flight, has now reached the villages of India.

There are also indications that the Coronavirus Warriors are feeling mentally and physically exhausted after fighting the Coronavirus for two consecutive months. However, the coronavirus peak has not yet arrived, and it is said that this peak may come in the last week of July.

The question arises as to how well prepared the system of government and private institutions fighting the Coronavirus in India’s cities and villages are. Since the flight of Indian students from Wuhan landed in India, organizations from the Ministry of Health to the district level have been working in an unprecedented manner.

In the last two months, there have been reports that officials and health workers risked their lives to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. While many female officers started work just days after giving birth, some officers worked without seeing their newborns for weeks.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Lok Sabha seat in Varanasi includes Gaurang Rathi, an IAS officer in charge of the war room in the fight against Coronavirus. Speaking to reporters, Gaurang says how ready his team is for the time to come.

“It’s been two months since the war room started in the fight against the coronavirus. In these two months, the staff of every department, including the top officials of the district, have left no stone unturned in stopping the coronavirus,” he said.

Varanasi, also known as Benares, Banaras, or Kashi, is a city on the banks of the river Ganges in Uttar Pradesh, India, 320 kilometres (200 mi) south-east of the state capital, Lucknow, and 121 kilometres (75 mi) east of Allahabad. A major religious hub in India, it is the holiest of the seven sacred cities (Sapta Puri) in Hinduism and Jainism, and played an important role in the development of Buddhism and Ravidassia.

“There has not been a single moment in the last two months where our employees have taken a single moment to rest, as new challenges are constantly emerging. We also had to work to boost the morale of our colleagues, as this was very necessary.”

Gaurang Rathi was asked how ready he is for new challenges with the opening of the lockdown. In response to this question, he says:

“It is true that cases of coronavirus are on the rise and opening a lockdown is challenging, but we have developed a sense of cleanliness among the general public. So now people have a responsibility to follow the hygiene rules that have been in place for months, as the coronavirus is something that can be easily overcome. “

Varanasi is like all the cities in India, where temples and mosques are crowded. Therefore, it is natural that there will be challenges for administrative officers in the coming days in districts across the country.

In the last two months, policemen in Mumbai and many other places, including Delhi, have been infected with the coronavirus. In Maharashtra so far 25 policemen have died and 2,211 policemen have been infected with the virus.

A policeman recently died hours after being discharged from the COVID-Care Center. So far 445 policemen have been infected with the coronavirus in Delhi. Also, three policemen have been killed.

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Benedict Kasigara

I have been working as a freelance editor/writer since 2006. My specialist subject is film and television having worked for over 10 years from 2005 during which time I was the editor of the BFI Film and Television.

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