Coronavirus — Iran Sets Record, Braces for Second Wave

  • “Watchfulness and observance of the health principles must still be on the agenda of everybody, and attending the unnecessary gatherings must be avoided.”
  • Since the end of June, the number of patients and deaths in the official statistics of the Ministry of Health of Iran has increased again.
  • "People do not comply. It has been decided that some public service units will not provide services if health protocols are not followed."

A look at the global death toll from Coronavirus infections shows that, for the second day in a row, Iran is among the countries with the highest official count. In this group, Mexico, Brazil, Russia, India, Pakistan, and the United States are still involved in the first wave of the Coronavirus pandemic.

On 19 February 2020, Iran reported its first confirmed cases of infections in Qom. As of July 1, there were 230,211 reported cases and 10,958 deaths. Both are rumored to be substantially higher.

However, the death toll in Iran has fallen slightly since the Coronavirus spread in April and March, and the first wave appears to have subsided. Hassan Rouhani, President of Iran said: “Watchfulness and observance of the health principles must still be on the agenda of everybody, and attending the unnecessary gatherings must be avoided.”

Rouhani added, “despite all efforts and the very good measures that have been taken in the fight against the disease and for the treatment of the patients, we still witness an increase in the number of infections in a number of cities because the coronavirus is unknown.”

Since the end of June, the number of patients and deaths in the official statistics of the Ministry of Health of Iran has increased again, and now it has reached more than 160 deaths per day.

The health condition of more than 3,000 patients in Iran has been reported to be critical, and the Ministry of Health has warned of overcrowding of hospital beds in the intensive care unit of the country’s hospitals.

At the end of June, Ali Akbar Haghdoost, Deputy Minister of Health and Chairman of the Epidemiology Committee of the National Headquarters for Combating Coronavirus, called for an “urgent decision” to return the restrictions related to Coronavirus’s pandemic. Reacting to the possibility of a second Coronavirus wave in Iran in mid-June, President Rouhani said “we should not make people anxious and worried.”

Hassan Rouhani is the seventh and current President of the Islamic Republic of Iran. He has been a member of Iran’s Assembly of Experts since 1999, and was Chief Nuclear Negotiator from 2003 to 2005. He was re-elected President in 2017.

Coronavirus is now in the red in eight provinces, and on alert in three provinces. The Ministry of Health says that in some cities, such as Mashhad, the situation has “crossed the red line and a very high warning has been issued for this metropolis in terms of coronavirus disease.”

The Ministry of Health, however, does not have a clear definition of “much higher alert status,” and as of June 30, restrictions related to the Coronavirus pandemic in Mashhad have not yet been implemented.

The National Anti-Coronavirus Headquarters in the metropolis of Tehran, while warning about the “widespread spread of the coronavirus” in Tehran, and increasing the number of visits to medical centers in this city, has called for restrictions. They are awaiting the decision of the government.

Ali Rabiee, a government spokesman, told reporters at a news conference on Tuesday that the National Anti-Coronavirus Headquarters was aware of the increase in the number of coronavirus infections.

Commenting on the headquarters’ decision to manage the current situation, Rabiee said, “people do not comply. It has been decided that some public service units will not provide services if health protocols are not followed.” Rabiee emphasized:

“We are planning not to enter the second wave of Coronavirus in the country. Our focus now is on the provinces that have entered the courier or have not entered at all so far. We want to improve our monitoring every day so that the achievements of the health care staff are not lost.”

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Benedict Kasigara

I have been working as a freelance editor/writer since 2006. My specialist subject is film and television having worked for over 10 years from 2005 during which time I was the editor of the BFI Film and Television.

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