Coronavirus — Johnson Locks Down Northern England

  • The Mayor of Greater Manchester, Andy Burnham, demanded an additional package of £65 million to alleviate the negative effects of the new restrictions.
  • On Saturday, the South Yorkshire region of 1.4 million people will join the areas subject to the strictest restrictions in force in England.
  • The United Kingdom is the country most affected by the coronavirus pandemic in Europe, with almost 44,000 deaths.

As per a directive from British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, effective this weekend, northern England will enter a “very high” level of alertness in a bid to battle the second wave of coronavirus. In addition to the closure of bars, the Prime Minister has also prohibited social gatherings in Manchester.

Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson reacts during a press conference at Downing Street on the government’s coronavirus action plan in London, March 3, 2020.

This is despite the opposition of the mayor of the metropolitan area of ​​the town of Manchester, as well as in the region of South Yorkshire.

Manchester, which in various areas exceeds incidences of 500 COVID cases per 100,000 inhabitants, will be at the “very high” level of coronavirus alert from midnight Thursday to Friday. This is the maximum on the scale of three degrees, which the Johnson-led administration has designed.

The Mayor of Greater Manchester, Andy Burnham, demanded an additional package of £65 million to alleviate the negative effects of the new restrictions on individuals and companies. However, his negotiation with the central executive was broken yesterday without an agreement.

In a press conference from his official Downing Street residence, Prime Minister Johnson stated that Manchester will receive an additional £22 million, financing that he considers proportional to that assigned to Liverpool, which last week also entered the highest alert.

A woman wearing a face mask passes a Public Health England sign, warning arriving passengers that the coronavirus has been detected in Wuhan in China, at Terminal 4 of London Heathrow Airport in West London on Jan. 28, 2020.

The Prime Minister explained that he wasn’t so keen on applying the tough measures, but maintained that “failure to act would endanger Manchester’s public health system and the lives of many of its residents.”

Mayor Burnham, responsible for a region where about 2.8 million people live, said, for his part, that accepting the government’s restrictions without receiving the financial aid he requested does not allow him to fulfill his “commitments.”

During a press conference in Manchester city on Tuesday, Mr. Burnham said the region had simply not been offered enough money to help the poorest people through the winter. “Is this a game of poker?” he asked.

“Is this a game of poker? Are they playing poker with places and people’s lives through a pandemic? Is that what this is about? Are they piling pressure on people to accept the lowest figure they can get away with? Is that how they are running this country?”

On Saturday, the South Yorkshire region of 1.4 million people will join the areas subject to the strictest restrictions in force in England. Dan Jarvis, Mayor of Sheffield, the largest city in the affected area, said that together with the areas local leaders, they had secured funding of £41 million from the government to support residents and businesses in the affected area.

The United Kingdom is the country most affected by the coronavirus pandemic in Europe, with almost 44,000 deaths. It is reacting in a localized way to the resurgence, which has caused tensions between London and local communities.

Across the United Kingdom, 21,331 new cases of COVID-19 and 241 deaths were registered a day ago, the highest number of deaths since June.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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