Coronavirus — Kenyan Govt. Warns Against Misinformation

  • Dr. Mercy Mwangangi, has called on the media to take responsibility for what is being distributed.
  • The Ministry of Health announced 580 new infections, bringing the total to 29, 334 cases of certified cases.
  • Three officials at KEMSA have been suspended from work following allegations of violations of the procurement rules for anti-coronavirus funds.

There is misleading information about an alleged COVID-19 treatment that is circulating on social media, and also distributed by some media outlets, the Kenyan government has warned. The Ministry of Health is urging people to be aware that coronavirus has no cure, but its infection is controlled according to established rules and strategies.

Dr. Mercy Mwangangi is the Chief Administrative Secretary of the Ministry of Health in Kenya.

The Assistant Minister in the Kenya Ministry of Health, Dr. Mercy Mwangangi, has called on the media to take responsibility for what is being distributed while reporting coronavirus infections in the country in the past 24 hours.

“We urge the media and other relevant organizations to provide the public with relevant information and, according to the health department,” Dr. Mwangangi said at Health House, Nairobi, on Friday.

The Assistant Minister said it was particularly noticeable on social media, with some contributors disseminating information on coronavirus treatment, which she described as misleading to the public.

“We have seen reports of drug combinations, with people claiming it cures coronavirus. The dissemination of such messages is crippling the fight against the disease,” Dr. Mwangangi warned. She said the Ministry of Health is committed to making the right information.

COVID-19 has not received any official vaccine or treatment approved by the World Health Organization (WHO) so far, although those infected with medical attention and treatment are recovering. Doctors, health, and medical professionals, as well as scientists around the world, are in search of a vaccine and coronavirus treatment.

On Friday, in the 147th session to explain the status of COVID-19 in the country, the Ministry of Health announced 580 new infections, bringing the total to 29, 334 cases of certified cases. About 198 patients from various health facilities, as well as home care, have been confirmed to recover, with a total of 15,298 survivors in the country.

However, over the past 24 hours, COVID-19 has caused the deaths of five people, with a total of 465 confirmed deaths from the disease.

Kemsa Chiefs Suspended From Work Following Coronavirus Money Saga

The COVID-19 pandemic reached Kenya in March 2020 with the initial cases reported in the capital city Nairobi and in the coastal area Mombasa county. As of August 15, there were 29,334 confirmed cases and 465 deaths from COVID-19.

The Chief Executive Officer of the Kenya Medical Supplies Authority (KEMSA) – Jonah Manjari Mwangi and two other officials have been suspended from work following allegations of violations of the procurement rules for anti-coronavirus funds.

Investigations are ongoing to determine how the agency awarded tenders for more than Sh100 billion ($922 million) awarded to Kenya by donors to support the fight against the coronavirus epidemic in the country.

According to the organization’s board chairman, Kembi Gitura, Dr. Mwangi was suspended along with Head of Procurement Charles Juma and Director of Commercial Affairs Eliud Mureithi for the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (EACC).

The board has appointed Edward Njoroge Njuguna, director of planning, as acting chief executive officer. Mr. Edward Buluma will be the acting head of the procurement department, and Dr. George Walukana will hold the position of director of the business.

The move came after it was revealed that KEMSA officials may have violated procurement rules by awarding  Sh 4 billion tender directly to a company known as Kilig Limited. Other companies were awarded multi-million dollar tenders before six months of their registration.

The deals were questioned after it emerged that the companies were selling equipment at a higher price than usual. For example, one company sold the KN95 for Sh700 while the average price was Sh450.

Officials in the agency have defended themselves, saying the price was too high due to the global shortage of equipment when they submitted the bids.

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George Mtimba

George clarifies how the news is changing the world, how world news trends affect you. Also, George is a professional journalist, a freelance news reporter and writer who is passionate with current world news.

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