Coronavirus: Over 200,000 Dead Worldwide

  • Five countries have more than 20,000 deaths, but the method of recording deaths varies.
  • The United States has the highest number of deaths, exceeding 50,000.
  • WHO explained earlier this week that the number of people infected with the new virus is increasing in Africa, Eastern Europe, and Latin America.

The death toll due to COVID-19, caused by the new coronavirus, has exceeded 200,000 worldwide.So far, the total number of infected people has reached nearly 2.9 million. This is according to statistics compiled by Johns Hopkins University. Deaths from the new virus were first reported by Chinese state media on January 11.

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with international public health. It was established on 7 April 1948, and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO is a member of the United Nations Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organization, was an agency of the League of Nations.

So far, the infection has been confirmed in more than 210 countries and regions. Five countries have more than 20,000 deaths, but the method of recording deaths varies. The United States has the highest number of deaths, exceeding 50,000. This is followed by Italy and Spain.

The British Ministry of Health announced on the 25th that COVID-19 has killed more than 20,000 people in hospitals. Interior Secretary Priti Patel said the number was a “deeply tragic and moving moment,” and warned that “we are not out of the woods yet.” The UK statistics do not include deaths at home or in nursing homes, so the actual death toll is said to be higher.

In France, which includes deaths from nursing homes, 22,614 people have died since early March. The death toll on the 24th was 369. However, according to the authorities, the number of deaths in hospitals is decreasing, and the number of people receiving intensive care is decreasing for seven consecutive days.

The World Health Organization (WHO) explained earlier this week that the number of people infected with the new virus is increasing in Africa, Eastern Europe, and Latin America. Secretary-General Tedros Adamano Gebreyesus pointed out that while the epidemic in Western Europe appears to be flat or shrinking, it has just begun to increase in many countries.

“Some (countries) that were affected early in the pandemic are now starting to see a resurgence in cases,” he said. For example, Singapore was initially acclaimed for successfully containing the new virus, but recently the infection has spread to industrial areas and labor dormitories. On the other hand, Chinese officials announced on the 25th that there were zero deaths for 10 days. South Korea also no deaths for the second consecutive day.

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), also known as 2019-nCoV acute respiratory disease (2019-nCoV ARD), and novel coronavirus pneumonia (NCP) is a viral respiratory disease caused by the 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). It was first detected during the 2019–20 Wuhan coronavirus outbreak.

Difficult to Compare Countries

Statisticians have pointed out that the death toll reported by countries does not necessarily represent the overall picture of the new virus epidemic. For example, the United States has an exceptionally high death toll of over 53,000, but its population is approximately 330 million.

This, of course, is much higher than in other countries. This is almost equal to the total population (about 320 million people) of the five largest Western European countries (UK, Germany, France, Italy, and Spain). And the death toll from COVID-19 across Europe is higher than in the United States.

Also, the method of recording dead people varies from country to country. In some countries, the overall picture, including the number of deaths in nursing homes, is clearly stated. In other countries, only those who have been identified as COVID-19 and died in hospitals are counted.

In Belgium, for example, 6,917 people have died from the new virus for a population of 11.4 million. However, more than half of those who died in nursing homes, including those suspected of being COVID-19, appear to be very serious in the data.

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Benedict Kasigara

I have been working as a freelance editor/writer since 2006. My specialist subject is film and television having worked for over 10 years from 2005 during which time I was the editor of the BFI Film and Television.

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