Coronavirus: UK Death Toll Hits 20,000

  • Sir Patrick Vallance, a government chief scientific adviser, once said in March that fewer than 20,000 deaths would be a good result.
  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson will return to work from the morning of the 27th.
  • Government statistics do not include the number of people who died outside of hospitals, such as homes, nursing homes, and hospice.

The British Ministry of Health announced on the 25th that the number of deaths confirmed in hospitals in the country due to the new coronavirus exceeded 20,000. On that day, 813 people were confirmed dead in the hospital. At a regular government meeting, Home Secretary Priti Patel said the passing point of 20,000 was “a deeply tragic and moving moment.”

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), also known as 2019-nCoV acute respiratory disease (2019-nCoV ARD), and novel coronavirus pneumonia (NCP) is a viral respiratory disease caused by the 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). It was first detected during the 2019–20 Wuhan coronavirus outbreak.

Sir Patrick Vallance, a government chief scientific adviser, once said in March of the number of deaths that “if it is less than 20,000 . . . that would be a good result though every death is a tragedy, but we should not be complacent about that.” Meanwhile, Professor Stephen Powis, head of the medical sector at the National Health Service (NHS) England, said that the strict guidelines are “certainly effective” in controlling the spread of infection.

Under these circumstances, it was revealed that Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who was being treated for an infectious disease caused by a new Coronavirus (COVID-19), will return to work from the morning of the 27th. Prime Minister Johnson was temporarily in the intensive care unit (ICU) in London after developing COVID-19, but was discharged two weeks ago. He was recuperating at Chequers.

In the UK, with a population of about 67 million people, the first death from a new virus was confirmed 51 days ago. By the 25th, there were 20,319 deaths confirmed in the hospital. Government statistics do not include the number of people who died outside of hospitals, such as homes, nursing homes, and hospice.

Higher Death Tolls Outside Hospitals

The number of people who die in these places outside the hospital is published every Tuesday by the Office for National Statistics (ONS), based on death reports. In England and Wales, the ONS reported at least 1,662 people died outside the hospital due to COVID-19 in the week ending April 10. This differs from the Department of Health, while 8,673 people died in hospitals.

Coronaviruses are species of virus belonging to the subfamily Coronavirinae in the family Coronaviridae, in the order Nidovirales. There are seven known strains of human coronaviruses, including COVID-19.

In a tweet on the 21st, the ONS reported that the total number of deaths related to COVID-19 in England and Wales by April 10th was 13,121. According to the Ministry of Health data, it was 9,288. This difference is due to ONS including the number of people with “COVID-19” written in death notices, regardless of location. This includes cases where it is suspected of being the cause of death.

In England, 28,760 tests were conducted on the 24th. The government says it will expand its daily test capacity to 100,000 by the end of April. So far, more than 20,000 people have been killed in the United Kingdom. According to the statistics by Johns Hopkins University in the United States, the number of deaths due to the new virus exceeded 200,000 worldwide.

Sir Patrick said he was “wishing” to reduce the death toll in Britain to less than 20,000 as of March 17. The number of deaths at a British hospital at that time was around 70 per day. NHS England professor Powis also said at the time that Britain would “be very well at the epidemic” if it did not cross this line.

“And this was going to be a huge challenge not just for the UK, but for every country. I think unfortunately we have seen that challenge, not just here but around the globe.” Professor Powis added, “even in countries that have got on top of this early on we are unfortunately beginning to see new infections. So I think the first thing to emphasize is that this, unfortunately, is not going to be something we will begin to get over in the next few weeks.”

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Joyce Davis

My history goes back to 2002 and I  worked as a reporter, interviewer, news editor, copy editor, managing editor, newsletter founder, almanac profiler, and news radio broadcaster.

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