Coronavirus — US to Begin Distributing Vaccines

  • In addition to medical staff and nursing home residents, senior White House officials are also expected to receive vaccinations.
  • The first batch of COVID-19 vaccine in the United States has about 300,000 doses, and the package has GPS tracking sensors.
  • About half of the American population wants to be vaccinated as soon as possible.

The United States began shipping the first batch of COVID-19 vaccines to all states in the United States at low temperatures from December 13, and is expected to be distributed to 636 distribution centers across the United States before the 16th. Pfizer and BioNTech have obtained emergency authorization from the US Food and Drug Administration for the vaccine.

Tate Trujillo, director of pharmacy at Indiana University Health, with cold-storage units and shipping containers suitable for the Covid-19 vaccine.

A source said that in addition to medical staff and nursing home residents, senior White House officials are also expected to receive vaccinations. The first batch of vaccines is about 3 million doses and is expected to be distributed to 145 locations in the United States on Monday.

A source told Reuters that U.S. President Donald Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, and some senior U.S. officials will start vaccinating. The source said that key officials of the White House and specific officials of the three major government departments will receive the vaccine in the next 10 days.

Since President Trump had contracted the new coronavirus and recovered, it is not clear whether President Trump will receive the vaccine immediately. It is also unclear whether Joe Biden, Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), and other members of the Biden transitional government have also been provided with the new coronavirus vaccine.

Earlier, two sources told Reuters that the purpose of providing vaccines to senior officials was to avoid the spread of the new coronavirus epidemic in the White House. In the past, there was a wave of coronavirus in the White House. Many senior officials have been diagnosed with it.

The first batch of COVID-19 vaccine in the United States has about 300,000 doses, and the package has GPS tracking sensors. Federal officials said that 145 distribution centers across the United States will receive a portion of the vaccine on Monday, another 425 distribution centers will receive the vaccine on Tuesday, and the last 66 distribution centers will receive the vaccine on Wednesday.

Officials said that the first batch of vaccines was distributed based on the adult population of each state, and then the governments of each state decided how to distribute them. For example, in California, medical staff are listed as a priority group for vaccination, but state officials give priority to providing vaccines to hospitals with good storage capacity, serving high-risk groups, and the ability to administer vaccines quickly.

A package of vaccine supplies sent by McKesson to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

The first batch of vaccines is shipped by FedEx Express and UPS. FedEx Express dispatched more than 630 packages of cryogenic vaccines to various parts of the United States. Richard W. Smith, who oversees the delivery process, said “this is a historic day.”

The delivery of vaccines attaches great importance to speed, especially since this batch of vaccines must be stored in a very low-temperature environment. The staff of Pfizer Pharmaceuticals in fluorescent yellow overalls neatly packaged vaccines.

After scanning the package, they put the package in a freezer with dry ice. These freezer boxes will then be taken away from Pfizer’s center in Portage, Michigan, to Gerald R. Ford International Airport in Grand Rapids. They will then be sent to all parts of the United States by cargo plane.

According to a poll conducted by the Associated Press’s Public Affairs Research Center (NORC Center for Public Affairs Research), about half of the American population wants to be vaccinated as soon as possible. A quarter of Americans said they were “unsure,” and the last quarter of Americans expressed “no interest.”

Some people are opposed to vaccines in general, and some people are worried that the vaccine will be launched hastily and want to wait and see the effectiveness of the first batch of vaccines.

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Joyce Davis

My history goes back to 2002 and I  worked as a reporter, interviewer, news editor, copy editor, managing editor, newsletter founder, almanac profiler, and news radio broadcaster.

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