Erdogan Launches a Sharp Attack on Macron, Questions His Mental Powers

  • “What else can be said to a head of state who does not understand freedom of belief..." said Erdogan.
  • Macron's proposal raised the protection of his country's secular values ​​from followers of extremist Islamic values.
  • French history professor Samuel Bate was brutally murdered after showing his students cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad.

The Turkish president launched a sharp attack on his French counterpart, asking him to “check his mental health”, due to the latter’s proposal to protect his country’s secular values. For its part, Jordan condemned the re-publication of the caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad “under the pretext of freedom of expression.”

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan is a Turkish politician serving as the 12th and current President of Turkey. He previously served as Prime Minister of Turkey from 2003 to 2014 and as Mayor of Istanbul from 1994 to 1998.

On Saturday, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan condemned the policies of his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron towards Muslims, saying that he should “examine his mental health.”

“What is the problem of this person called Macron with Muslims and Islam? Macron needs treatment on a mental level,” Erdogan said.

“What else can be said to a head of state who does not understand freedom of belief and who behaves in this way to millions of people living in his country who are members of a different faith?” Erdogan added.

Macron’s proposal raised the protection of his country’s secular values ​​from followers of extremist Islamic values. Macron described Islam this month as a religion that is in “crisis” around the world.

He indicated that the government will introduce a bill in December to tighten a law passed in 1905 that formally separates church and state in France. He also announced tightening supervision of schools and improving control of foreign funding for mosques.

 Jordan Condemns the Continued Publication of the Cartoons

The Jordanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs condemned, in a statement on Saturday, the re-publication of what it described as the “offensive cartoons” of the Prophet Muhammad “under the pretext of freedom of expression”. Also, condemning “any attempt to link Islam with terrorism.”

The statement quoted the ministry’s spokesman, Dhaif Allah Ali Al-Fayez, as saying that his country “condemns the continuing publication of such cartoons and (expresses) its deep dissatisfaction with these practices, which represent harm to the feelings of nearly two billion Muslims and constitute a clear targeting of religious symbols, beliefs and sanctities and a flagrant violation. For the principles of respect for others and their beliefs”.

Al-Fayez believed that what he described as “insults” nourished “the culture of extremism and violence that the Kingdom condemns,” stressing “the need for the international community to reject insulting to religious sanctities and symbols.”

He also affirmed, “Jordan’s condemnation of any discriminatory and misleading attempts that seek to link Islam with terrorism, a falsification of the true essence of Islam.”

Emmanuel Jean-Michel Frédéric Macron is a French politician who has been President of France and ex officio Co-Prince of Andorra since 14 May 2017.

On the other hand, the Islamic Action Front, the political arm of the Muslim Brotherhood and the most prominent opposition party in Jordan, condemned “the re-publication of the cartoons insulting to the Prophet Muhammad and the statements of President Macron against Islam. And the systematic targeting of mosques and Islamic organizations practiced by the French authorities,” as the party puts it.

It is noteworthy that the French history professor Samuel Bate was brutally murdered after showing his students cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, while the assailant was killed by the police. French President Emmanuel Macron described the attack as an “Islamic terrorist attack”.

This attack came three weeks after an attack with a sharp device carried out by a 25-year-old Pakistani man in front of the old headquarters of “Charlie Hebdo”, which resulted in the injury of two people who were seriously injured. The perpetrator told investigators that he did so in response to the re-publication of the “Charlie Hebdo” cartoon.

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Joyce Davis

My history goes back to 2002 and I  worked as a reporter, interviewer, news editor, copy editor, managing editor, newsletter founder, almanac profiler, and news radio broadcaster.

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