France Talks Tough With Turkey on Values

  • Diplomatic tension between France and Turkey has intensified in recent days.
  • France's satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo published a cartoon mocking President Erdogan on its cover page. 
  • Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani also weighed in on the debate.

France “will never renounce its principles and values,” in regard to its recent tough stance on Muslims, despite what it terms as “attempts at destabilization and intimidation” by Turkey. This has been said Wednesday by the spokesman for the Franch president, Gabriel Attal, who also underscored “a strong European unity.”

Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan said: ‘My sadness and anger does not stem from the disgusting attack on my person but from the fact that the same [publication] is the source of the impertinent attack to my dear Prophet.’
The EU stands behind France’s stance against Islamic violence after the beheading of a French teacher on October 16. Attal added, that this was particularly true with regard to “freedom of expression and freedom of publication.” Attal made his remarks while addressing the press after a council of Ministers meeting.

Diplomatic tension between France and Turkey has intensified in recent days after the French President, Emmanuel Macron, declared a tough stance on Islam following the recent murder of a French history professor who was beheaded by an extremist Muslim young man.

In reaction, the President of Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, questioned Macron’s “mental health,” and called for an immediate boycott of all French products in the country. 

In addition to that, France’s satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo published a cartoon mocking President Erdogan on its cover page. Turkish officials railed against the magazine on Wednesday, accusing the magazine of sowing seeds of hatred and animosity.

“We strongly condemn the publication concerning our president of the French magazine, which has no respect to faith, the sacred and values,” Erdogan’s spokesman, Ibrahim Kalin, wrote on Twitter.

The French spokesman, in reaction to the same, on his part, warned that it was statements of hatred against journalists that led to attacks and massacres that have taken place in France in recent years.

France’s President Emmanuel Macron. France has vowed “never retreat from it’s principles and values.”

“It was hateful comments toward journalists, toward a newsroom, that led to the bloodshed we have seen in recent years in our country,” he said, referring to the 2015 attack on Charlie Hebdo that killed twelve people, and was the first in a series of extremist attacks on France.

On Wednesday, the Council of Ministers decided to ban the Muslim organization BarakaCity, accused by the executive of links to “the radical Islamist movement,” “incitement to hatred ” and “justifying terrorist acts.”

The decision was announced by Interior Minister Gérard Darmanin on Twitter, who had already defended the dissolution of the organization after the beheading of the French professor earlier this month.

The non-governmental organization is chaired by Driss Yemmou (Idriss Sihamedi on Twitter), suspected of online harassment of a Charlie Hebdo journalist. According to the minister, Yemmou “participates in the spread of an ideology that calls for hate, discrimination, and violence.”

Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani also weighed in on the debate, owing to the fact that the country is also an Islamic republic. Speaking at a cabinet meeting, he has said thus in defense of Muslims:

If Europe and France are after rights, ethics, and culture they have to withdraw from intervention in Muslim affairs,” Rouhani said.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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