Guinea — At Least Three Killed in Post-Election Violence

  • “At least three people died today that I saw with my own eyes . . . and about 10 others were wounded,”
  • The clashes have taken place particularly in places considered strongholds of the opposition.
  • Official results haven’t been announced, raising fears of intensifying tensions in the country.

At least three people died Wednesday in the Guinean capital, Conakry, following clashes between opposition supporters and security forces. In recent days, following the presidential election, Guinea has witnessed several clashes between supporters of the nation’s opposition leader, Cellou Dalien Diallo, and the police.

A protester walks in front of a cloud of tear gas, during a mass protest the morning after preliminary results were released for five communes in Conakry on 21 October 2020.

“At least three people died today that I saw with my own eyes . . . and about 10 others were wounded,” Mamadou Keganan Doumbouya told AFP. Amidst tears, Hadjiratou Barry, a resident of Conakry, where the clashes took place, also told AFP that her brother had been shot dead. 

Elsewhere, a local doctor who chose to remain anonymous said that he had received two dead bodies, and nine injured people, at his clinic. The clashes have taken place particularly in places considered strongholds of the opposition.

The outgoing President, Alpha Condé, who ran for a third term at the age of 82, took to social media to implore the country to remain calm as the country awaits the outcome of the ongoing electoral process.

On Tuesday evening, the Independent National Electoral Commission (CENI), responsible for organizing elections in Guinea, announced the first results of Sunday’s ballot in four of 38 constituencies. As per the announced results, Condé is ahead by a large margin.

Still, a CENI employee warned that it is not safe to “extrapolate” these results to a national result. Diallo accused the head of state of “doing everything possible to alter the results of the ballot boxes in his favor.”

Early Monday afternoon, Diallo had claimed victory in Sunday’s elections in the first round, although official results haven’t been announced, raising fears of intensifying tensions in the country.

“Despite the serious anomalies that marred the smooth running of the . . . election and in view of the results that came out of the ballot boxes, I am victorious in this election in the first round,” Diallo told journalists and cheering supporters on Monday, a day after the vote was held.

President Alpha Condé’s main rival is Cellou Dalein Diallo (R).

CENI criticized Diallo’s statements, and dismissed the proclamation as “null and void.” Bakary Mansare, vice president of the electoral authority, told AFP, “it is not up to a candidate or a person to proclaim himself the winner outside the bodies defined by the law.”

About 5.4 million voters on Sunday went to polls to choose the next President of Guinea, a neighboring country of Guinea-Bissau, in an election marked by the challenge to Alpha Condé’s re-election and the death of dozens of protesters.

Condé, elected in 2010, was the country’s first democratically elected head of state after decades of authoritarian regimes in Guinea. He was re-elected in 2015 for a second term, and is now trying hard to earn himself a third term in office.

During a highly contested referendum in March, he approved a new constitution and then considered, with his supporters, that the new constitution allows him to run again for another term.

His opponents denounced it as a “constitutional coup.” According to the opposition, at least 90 people died in the last year due to incidents during demonstrations against a new Condé candidacy.

Only $1/click

Submit Your Ad Here

Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

Leave a Reply