India — Nagaland Bans Dog Meat

  • "Appreciate the wise decision taken by the State’s Cabinet," tweeted Nagaland Chief Secretary Temjen Toy.
  • Some civil society groups have strongly criticized the ban, saying it is an attack on eating habits in the state.
  • The Indian state of Nagaland has banned the sale, trade, and marketing of dog meat.

The northeastern Indian state of Nagaland has banned the sale of dog meat, following campaigns and demands from animal welfare groups. These groups have hailed the northeastern state’s decision as a turning point in ending dog atrocities in India.

Nagaland is a landlocked state in north-eastern India. It has an area of 16,579 square kilometers (6,401 sq mi) with a population of 1,980,602 per the 2011 Census of India, making it one of the smallest states of India.

“The State Government has decided to ban commercial import and trading of dogs and dog markets and also the sale of dog meat, both cooked and uncooked. Appreciate the wise decision taken by the State’s Cabinet,” tweeted Nagaland Chief Secretary Temjen Toy.

However, some civil society groups have strongly criticized the ban, saying it is an attack on eating habits in the state. In many parts of India, eating dog meat is illegal, but some communities in the northeast consider it healthy. The Indian state of Nagaland has banned the sale, trade, and marketing of dog meat.

Chief Secretary Timjan Toy did not elaborate in his tweet on how the government would enforce the ban. According to Indian media, the ban was imposed at a time when pictures of dogs in sacks in an animal market were circulating widely on social media, and the public was outraged. “This is a major turning point in ending the cruelty in India’s hidden  dog  meat  trade,” animal protection advocacy group Humane Society International (HSI) said in a statement.

On Thursday, the Federation of Indian Animal Protection Organizations (FIAPO) said it was in a “terrible state” when dogs were slaughtered illegally in a market, with their meat tied in sacks for consumption. “I was shocked and frightened.” The group called on the Nagaland government to immediately ban the sale of dog meat.

Humane Society International (HSI) is the international division of The Humane Society of the United States. Founded in 1991, HSI has expanded The HSUS’s activities into Central and South America, Africa, and Asia. HSI’s Asian, Australian, Canadian, and European offices carry out field activities and programs.

The FIAPO, along with the People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), is one of several animal rights organizations that led a campaign against the sale of dog meat in Nagaland. The Human Society International (HSI) has been campaigning for years to shut down the dog meat business in India. It welcomed the decision of the Nagaland government.

“The suffering of dogs in Nagaland has long cast a dark shadow over India, and so this news marks a major turning point in ending the cruelty of India’s hidden dog meat trade,” HSI managing director Alokparna Sengupta said

The HSI says an estimated 30,000 dogs are brought to Nagaland illegally each year, where they are sold at an animal market and “beaten to death with wooden sticks.” Earlier this year, the northeastern state of Mizoram amended the law to take the first step towards ending the sale of dogs. To do this, they removed the dog from the list of suitable animals to be slaughtered.

“This is a progressive move,” Abu Metha, an advisor to Nagaland’s highest elected official, Neiphiu Rio, tweeted. “In today’s age-positive social media activism & advocacy has enormous impact on policy makers. Congrats & Thanks to all.”

Although dogs are not widely used in food, they are eaten in many other countries, including China, South Korea, and Thailand.

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Joyce Davis

My history goes back to 2002 and I  worked as a reporter, interviewer, news editor, copy editor, managing editor, newsletter founder, almanac profiler, and news radio broadcaster.

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