Iranian Ambassador: We Will Not Negotiate With US Despite Bolton’s Ouster

  • "We have stated many times, and the Iranian president has made it clear, that as long as these cruel sanctions and the economic terrorism of the US government against the Iranian people continue, there is no room for conversation."
  • The day after John Bolton's ouster, President Rouhani said, "both the militants must go and the maximum American pressure must be lifted."
  • Hours after the announcement of the ousting of Bolton, the American Secretaries of Treasury and State announced new sanctions against Iran.

Majid Takht-Ravanchi, Iran’s Ambassador to the United Nations, has said that Iran will not negotiate with the United States, despite John Bolton’s ouster. The day before, US President Donald Trump announced that he had fired Bolton as US National Security Adviser. Mr. Bolton is a hard-line figure and a strong supporter of the MEK in the White House.

The People’s Mujahedin of Iran (MEK) is an Iranian political-militant organization based on Islamic and socialist ideology. It advocates overthrowing the Islamic Republic of Iran leadership and installing its own government. It has been described as Iran’s largest and most active opposition group, and has been supported by several American officials.

As the UN General Assembly convened in New York, and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani was present, there were speculations about the likelihood of the Iranian and US presidents meeting. The Iranian envoy said, “we have stated many times, and the Iranian president has made it clear, that as long as these cruel sanctions and the economic terrorism of the US government against the Iranian people continue, there is no room for conversation.”

Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has said he will not allow the president and government officials to negotiate with the Trump administration. He has called the current US government a “double poison.”

Hassan Rouhani, who has at times expressed willingness to negotiate with the US in his latest remarks, has ruled out a meeting with the US president, saying that if sanctions were lifted and the United States returned to a nuclear deal, it would only be possible to negotiate. There is a 1+1 group format. The day after John Bolton’s ouster, he said, “both the militants must go and the maximum American pressure must be lifted.”

The Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Iran to the United Nations Office in New York dismissed any further changes to Donald Trump’s administration as fruitless, and said, “our policy is very clear, this policy has nothing to do with US government change. America’s economy will not be canceled, there is no room for dialogue.” He described the latest US sanctions against Iran as a sign of the continued “maximum pressure” the Trump administration has on Iran.

Majid Takht-Ravanchi is an Iranian diplomat and the Ambassador of Iran to the United Nations. Takht-Ravanchi holds a BS and MS from The University of Kansas in Civil Engineering, an MA from Fordham University in International Political Economy and Development, and a PhD from the University of Bern in Political Science. He has often accompanied Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif in negotiations with the P5+1.

Hours after the announcement of the ousting of Bolton, the American Secretaries of Treasury and State announced new sanctions against Iran at a joint news conference at the White House. New sanctions will target individuals and entities linked to Hamas, al-Qaeda, and the Revolutionary Guards. US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told the news conference that John Bolton’s resignation does not mean changing Trump’s policies.

With Trump pulling out of the deal, he has imposed an unprecedented set of sanctions against Iran, saying he will continue “maximum pressure,” with the aim of “normalizing Iranian government behavior.” Since the beginning of the sanctions, Iran’s oil exports have fallen from less than 5 million barrels to less than 4,000 barrels a day.

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Joyce Davis

My history goes back to 2002 and I  worked as a reporter, interviewer, news editor, copy editor, managing editor, newsletter founder, almanac profiler, and news radio broadcaster.

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