Iranian Oil Tanker Arrives in Venezuela

  • The minister released several messages confirming the arrival of the oil tanker in Venezuela. 
  • Iran recently sent three other fuel tankers to Venezuela, which are following an alternative route through southern Africa.
  • The opposition accuses the government of “dismantling” the oil industry and having made damaging deals with China and Russia.

A tanker from Iran recently arrived in Venezuela with condensed gas to produce gasoline, circumventing the sanctions imposed by the United States against both countries, Venezuelan Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza announced. The announcement was made via the social media network, Twitter.

Supertanker Horse turned off its satelite signal on Aug. 7.

There, the minister released several messages from, amongst other sources, the independent online service for maritime activities Tanker Trackers (TT), confirming the arrival of the oil tanker in Venezuela. 

One of the messages read thus:

“Iranian VLCC supertanker carrying 2 million barrels of gas condensate suddenly pops up at the José Terminal, Venezuela. Most likely sailed all the way around southern Africa given her transponder was switched off. Name & IMO number has been painted over. Goes by a new name: HONEY”.

On the other hand, a message from the Venezuelan NGO Sures, released by the Venezuelan minister, explains that the first Iranian tanker, Honey, docked in Venezuela, loaded with approximately one million barrels of gasoline.

It elaborated that the tanker arrived at José’s Storage and Shipment Terminal, in Puerto La Cruz (340 kilometers east of Caracas), and sailed to the country (Venezuela) without a name, so as not to be identified. According to TT, Iran recently sent three other fuel tankers to Venezuela, which are following an alternative route through southern Africa.

Last Friday, Venezuela announced the activation of a plan to supply the fuel market, a product increasingly scarce locally, which has led to long lines and protests across the country.  The state commission Petróleos de Venezuela SA ( Pdvsa ) recently said in a statement:

“We report the implementation, temporarily, of a special contingency plan to supply fuel, which will aim to normalize and regularize this new distribution scheme in the short and medium-term.” 

In the document, the Venezuelan government reaffirms “the commitment to produce (locally) all gasoline and other products necessary for Venezuela’s energy development.”

In recent weeks, queues for fuel have multiplied in various regions of Venezuela, with the population complaining that, even at international prices, there are more and more difficulties in supplying.

Caracas says the sanctions imposed by the United States are an “attack” on sovereignty that “has caused serious damage to the entire energy industry, affecting to a greater extent the fuel refining and production system.”

Workers from the Venezuelan state oil firm PDVSA check a pipeline at the oil port of La Cruz. Venezuela is the fifth largest oil exporter in the world, and supplies about 13% of daily oil.

The opposition accuses the government of “dismantling” the oil industry and having made damaging deals with China and Russia. On June 1, the Venezuelan government set the price of fuel for the first time in US dollars, with subsidies for some basic sectors.

The increase came after five ships with fuel from Iran arrived in Venezuela, an operation that was questioned by the United States, which announced that it had seized, for the first time, four Iranian oil tankers transporting gasoline to Venezuela.

The freighters Luna, Pandi, Bering, and Bella were apprehended on the high seas en route to Houston, Texas, after an authorization issued by a federal judge, according to The Wall Street Journal.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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