Iraqi PM Al-Kadhimi to Meet Trump Thursday

  • The Iraqi Prime Minister is scheduled to meet with the US President on Thursday.
  • Mustafa Kadhemi has said that Iraq still needs US help and support to counter the threats.
  • Kadhimi called Thursday's conversation with Donald Trump a strategic one.

Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi is leaving for the United States to meet with President Donald Trump. This is the first meeting between the two politicians. Kadhemi recently met with officials of the Islamic Republic of Iran. The reason for his trip to the United States is speculated.

Mustafa Al-Kadhimi is an Iraqi civil servant and politician currently serving as the Prime Minister of Iraq since May 2020. He is also a former director of the Iraqi National Intelligence Service, originally appointed in June 2016.

The visit of the new Iraqi Prime Minister to the United States, and his meeting with President Trump, is of particular importance in the current situation. In this regard, the Associated Press conducted an exclusive interview with the Iraqi Prime Minister on Tuesday.

The Iraqi Prime Minister is scheduled to meet with the US President on Thursday. Asked if he was carrying a special message from Iranian leaders to the United States, Kadhimi said, “we do not play the role of postman in Iraq,” the U.S.-backed prime minister said.

The question was posed by an Associated Press reporter from Kadhimi’s recent meeting with officials of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Kadhimi’s visit to the United States comes at a time when terrorist attacks in the country have increased and the number of missile attacks on US and Iraqi military facilities has increased.

Requires US Support

It has been three years since the Iraqi government declared victory over the Islamic State (ISIS). Despite this, attacks on the country’s military units continue. The Associated Press reports that the attacks both on military targets and Iraqi government agencies and institutions occur almost daily

In addition, the assassination of Hisham Hashimi, a whistleblower and reporter in Iraq in July, as well as the abduction of Hela Moyes, a German cultural activist in Baghdad, have overshadowed the Iraqi government’s ability to counter security threats.

Mustafa Kadhemi has said that Iraq still needs US help and support to counter the threats. The Iraqi Prime Minister has said that although Iraq’s need for US military support to counter ground attacks has diminished, the country still needs US cooperation and support in the end.

The Iraqi Prime Minister has said that the kind of cooperation and support that Iraq needs depends on the type of terrorist threats that exist against the country.

Qasem Soleimani was an Iranian Major General in the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and since 1998 commander of its Quds Force—a division primarily responsible for extraterritorial military and clandestine operations. Soleimani was killed in a targeted U.S. airstrike on 3 January 2020 in Baghdad, Iraq.

Strategic Dialogues

Mustafa Kadhimi became the Prime Minister of Iraq after a widespread wave of political protests in Iraq. The U.S. drone strike on a car carrying Quds Force commander Qassem Soleimani and Abu Mahdi Mohandes, a popular mobilization commander near Baghdad airport, drew widespread criticism of the US role in Iraq.

Kadhimi called Thursday’s conversation with Donald Trump a strategic one. The talks follow talks in June that escalated attacks on US facilities and positions.

AFP also reported on the increase in rocket attacks on US positions, as well as on Iraqi government institutions, in a report on Baghdad, while covering Kadhimi’s visit to Washington. According to the report, from October to the end of July, militias in Iraq fired 39 missiles at US positions and targets in Iraq.

The number of attacks has increased after the news of the meeting between Trump and Kadhimi was confirmed. For example, between August 4 and August 16, Iraqi military positions were attacked with 13 bombs and missiles.

While Shiite militias backed by the Islamic Republic of Iran claim to have played no role in the attacks, Hezbollah and other Iranian-backed Shiite militias are said to be carrying out similar attacks under other names.

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Joyce Davis

My history goes back to 2002 and I  worked as a reporter, interviewer, news editor, copy editor, managing editor, newsletter founder, almanac profiler, and news radio broadcaster.

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