Japan Created New Storage Technology

  • The new magnetic material is Epsilon-Iron oxide.
  • Tokyo developers claim that their development has a higher storage density, longer service life, low cost, increased energy efficiency and higher resistance to external interference compared to the classic version.
  • The new technology is expected to be on the market in five years.

The Japanese scientists from the Department of Chemistry, School of Science at the University of Tokyo created a new way to update the technology that is use for the data storage and the recording on the magnetic video. Solid-state drives (SSDS), Blu-ray disks and the other modern storage technologies allow to write and read information very quickly.

Setup of focused‐millimeter wave‐assisted magnetization reversal, design of the focusing ring, and the demonstration experiment.

Nevertheless,  they do not have the best storage density and can be very expensive to scale. Although magnetic tape has not been popular at the consumer level since the 1980s, in the field of data centers and longer-term archival storage, its lower speed is a reasonable price to pay for high data density.

Furthermore, the new magnetic material is Epsilon-Iron oxide. The material is supposedly fantastic for the long term storage.

The Tokyo developers claim that their development has a higher storage density, longer service life, low cost, increased energy efficiency and higher resistance to external interference compared to the classic version.

The work has been published as an open access at the Wiley Online Library titled “Magnetic‐Pole Flip by Millimeter Wave”.

According to the project leader Shinichi Okoshi  “When data is written to it, the magnetic states that the bits represent become resistant to external “parasitic” magnetic fields that might otherwise cause defects.

The new material has a strong magnetic anisotropy. Of course, this feature also means that the data itself is somewhat more difficult to write; however, we have a new approach to this part of the process as well.”

Moorever, Japanese scientists used a new method, which encompasses the magnetic recording using focused millimeter waves. Therefore, the millimeter waves at frequencies from 30 to 300 GHz are aimed at Epsilon-iron oxide bands, being under the influence of an external magnetic field.

Setup of focused‐millimeter wave‐assisted magnetization reversal, design of the focusing ring, and the demonstration experiment.

Millimeter waves, also known as extremely high frequency (EHF), is a band of radio frequencies that is well suited for 5G networks.  This causes the particles on the tape to change their magnetic direction, which creates a small amount of information.

Mari Yoshikio, who is also part of the team stated “This is how we overcome what in the field of data science is called the ‘magnetic recording trilemma.

The trilemma describes that to increase storage density, you need smaller magnetic particles, but they are also much less stable, and therefore data can be easily lost. So we had to use more stable magnetic materials and create a completely new way to record on them. What surprised me was that this process even turned out to be energy efficient.”

Overall, this project is a the beginning stage. Even though the concept has been completed. There are still a myriad of steps need to be taken to make the concept a viable technology.

Once, it is completed, the technology would be in demand. The applications can be utilized by the government agencies for storage, law enforcement and in private sector.

In conclusion, the team expects the technology to be readily available on the global scale int the next 5 years.

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Christina Kitova

I spent most of my professional life in finance, insurance risk management litigation.

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