Kaboré Re-elected President of Burkina Faso

  • “I will deploy all my efforts so that through continuous consultation, through dialogue . . . we can work together for peace and development,”
  • According to provisional results, Roch Marc Christian Kaboré won Sunday’s presidential election with 57.87% of the vote.
  • The opposition said that it considered the elections to be fraudulent and would not accept the results.

Burkina Faso’s incumbent President, Roch Marc Christian Kaboré, was re-elected to another five year term on Thursday, according to the National Independent Electoral Commission.  The Commission announced he had been re-elected in the first round. He promised in a speech to commit to a “permanent dialogue” to build a better country.

Burkina Faso’s President Roch Marc Christian Kabore holds his final campaign rally ahead of the presidential election, in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, November 20, 2020.

“I will deploy all my efforts so that through continuous consultation, through dialogue . . . we can work together for peace and development,” the president-elect said at his party’s headquarters in the capital, Ouagadougou.

He explained that in an election, there is a winner and loser, but pointed out that they are all Burkinese who should aspire to build a better Burkina Faso together for all the people. The re-elected head of state extended an olive branch to the opposition, which has already threatened not to recognize the electoral results, alleging election fraud.

According to provisional results, Roch Marc Christian Kaboré won Sunday’s presidential election with 57.87% of the vote, the Independent National Electoral Commission (CENI) reported Thursday.

Kaboré, who thus obtained a second five-year term, defeating 12 candidates. That included Eddie Komboigo, who came in second with 15.48% of the vote, and Zéphirin Diabré, with 12.46%.

Komboigo ran under the Congress for Democracy and Progress (CDP), the party of former President Blaise Compaoré, who were in power for 27 years, until Compaoré was overthrown by the popular uprising of October 2014.

“Mr Kabore . . . with 57.87 percent of the vote, is provisionally elected president of (Burkina) Faso in the first round,” said Newton Ahmed Barry, head of the Independent National Electoral Commission (CENI).

Burkina Faso, a poor country located in the Sahel Region, is landlocked, with 20.3 million inhabitants. It has been the subject, since 2015, of jihadist attacks, which have caused at least 1,200 deaths and more than 1 million internally displaced persons.

According to CENI, the number of voters in these presidential elections dropped from 6,490,662 to 5,893,4000 due to the failure to open about 1,300 polling stations. CENI said this was due to the insecurity caused by the jihadist groups. In addition, about 800 other polling stations, which should have been opened, remained closed.

Supporters of president Roch Marc Christian Kabore celebrate in Ouagadougou. The president won with more than 50% of the vote.

The presidential clan had predicted, as in 2015, a victory in the first round of these elections, considered as the most open in the history of Burkina Faso. The country has seen multiple coups since its independence.

The opposition said on Monday that it considered the elections, held peacefully despite the threat of jihadist attacks, to be fraudulent. They stressed that they would not accept the results.

 “It is absolutely inconceivablehaving travelled the whole of Burkina Faso, to think of having a winner in the first round,” said Zéphirin Diabré.

Any appeals must be submitted to the Constitutional Council or the State Council within seven days after the announcement of the results. The Constitutional Council or the State Council must proclaim the final results within 15 days after the appeal period has expired.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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