Kashmir Crisis: Nuclear War Won’t Be Won Between India and Pakistan

  • Khan said that in the event of such a war, "a disaster will not only happen here but its effects will be felt all over the world. It is the responsibility of the global community and global powers.”
  • Khan made frequent links between the BJP, India's ruling political party, and the RSS, a Hindu nationalist paramilitary organization.
  • Indian Prime Minister Modi said "I believe that India and Pakistan, which were the same before 1947, can jointly discuss these issues and resolve these issues well."

Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan has said that he is worried because the Indian government is taking steps to create a nuclear war on the subcontinent. Addressing the nation on Monday about the situation in India’s Kashmir, he said, “the way I see the Modi government’s ambitions, the kind of ideology they have if the problem goes to war. Remember, both countries have nuclear weapons and no one will win a nuclear war.”

He said that in the event of such a war, “a disaster will not only happen here but its effects will be felt all over the world. It is the responsibility of the global community and global powers.”

Imran Khan termed Narendra Modi’s termination of special status in India-administered Kashmir as a “historic mistake,” and said that now the opportunity for Kashmiris to be free has come.

India (1974) and Pakistan (1998) are two of the nine states declared (or believed) to have nuclear weapons. Both are non-signatories of the Non-Proliferation Treaty.

He said that Pakistan was able to address the issue internationally in a timely manner. Discussing the issue at the UN level, the international community recognized that this was a global issue. He added that “we have repeatedly briefed the international media on the issue, which has brought this issue to the world at large.”

He said that there has never been as much criticism about India in the western media as there is right now, which is happening today because there is so much cruelty in Kashmir. Khan said that Kashmiris are in a difficult position right now, and they should know that Pakistanis are standing with them.

Referring to his first speech, in which he talked about peace with India after the Prime Minister took over his government, he said that his government was trying to create peace in the country to eliminate poverty and create jobs for the people.

“India has the same problems so we tried to work together. We tried to resolve the Kashmir issue through dialogue, but whenever we talked about it, they would start something new.”

“Then we thought that if there was an election in India, things would go towards improvement, but after that, they tried to get Pakistan blacklisted by the Financial Action Task Force.”

Khan said that when India terminated the special constitutional status granted to India-administered Kashmir on August 5, it conveyed the message that India belongs to Hindus only, and all others are second-class citizens.

He made frequent links between the BJP, India’s ruling political party, and the RSS, a Hindu nationalist paramilitary organization. Pakistan has to understand that the BJP’s ideology is that of the RSS, Khan said, which believed that after British rule, there should be Hindu rule in India, and that Muslims were the enemy.

The Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (“National Volunteer Organization”) or RSS is a right-wing, Hindu nationalist paramilitary organization in India. It is widely regarded as the parent organization of the Bharatiya Janata Party, the BJP.

He said that it was the RSS that killed Mahatma Gandhi after independence in India, and that Pakistan takes the opposite viewpoint. “If someone in Pakistan oppresses minorities, then it is against Pakistan’s ideology, but in India, doing so is in line with RSS ideology.”

Khan said RSS has strengthened in India after the death of India’s first Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, and that is why today there is an increase in the number of people killed by the mob in India.

Khan said that if any Muslim countries were with India for trade or other matters instead of Kashmir, then Pakistan need not be disappointed. He expressed hope that other Muslim countries would also support Pakistan’s stand on the Kashmir issue in the future.

He appealed to the Pakistani people to express solidarity with Kashmir for half an hour on a day declared by the government one day each week, starting from this Friday.

Earlier, addressing the students of Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Technology in Swabi area of ​​Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, he said that he promises to the Kashmir people, and to his people, that he will keep raising his voice on Kashmir until the region becomes free.

Khan said that Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the Quaid-e-Azam (“Great Leader”) and founder of Pakistan, understood that if Pakistan did not become a country, it would suffer the same fate as other Muslims in India, as in the case of Indian-administered Kashmir.

He also thanked the students for addressing themselves as “Ambassador of Kashmir” on this occasion. Commenting on the country’s economic situation, he said that “the first year of the government was just to bring about economic stability,” but he hoped that things would improve in the coming years.

He said that Pakistan can only meet the current account deficit through tourism, but the biggest emphasis will be on strengthening its institutions and focusing on education.

Earlier, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, after a meeting with US President Trump on the sidelines of the G-7 Summit in France, said all the problems of India and Pakistan are mutual. There was no need for them to be addressed by a third country.

Modi further said “I believe that India and Pakistan, which were the same before 1947, can jointly discuss these issues and resolve these issues well.”

A curfew and stricter sanctions have been in place in the Kashmir Valley for the past three weeks as India’s special constitutional status of Kashmir has been abolished and internet and telephone service are still suspended.

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Joyce Davis

My history goes back to 2002 and I  worked as a reporter, interviewer, news editor, copy editor, managing editor, newsletter founder, almanac profiler, and news radio broadcaster.

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