Libya’s Warring Sides Sign Agreement for ‘Permanent Ceasefire’

  • It has been agreed that a joint police force will take over control of the disputed areas.
  • Representatives of the Faiz al-Siraj government and militias affiliated with General Haftar agreed to reopen air and air routes between the disputed areas.
  • On September 7, the two sides began five-day talks in Morocco to share power and areas under their influence.

Representatives of the Government of National Accord (GNA) and the Libyan National Army (LNA), the main parties to the conflict in the country, reached an agreement after four days of negotiations on a lasting ceasefire. UN Special Representative Stephanie Williams spoke of the historic moment when the agreement was signed.

Members of the Presidential Council of the Government of National Accord.

Representatives of the Al-Wefaq government in Tripoli and the rebels, under the command of Khalifa Haftar, signed a ceasefire agreement and a permanent ceasefire. This important step was taken after four days of talks in Geneva. The UN special envoy for Libya called the agreement “historic” and “a sign of hope” for the Lebanese people.

Ms. Williams condemned the presence of foreign militants in Libya and called for an end to interventions in the country. She stressed that the fire broke out immediately after the signing of the agreement.

“I would like to salute you because what you have accomplished here takes a great deal of courage”, said UNSMIL chief, and Acting Special Representative, Stephanie Williams, at a press conference in Geneva. “You have gathered for the sake of Libya, for the sake of your people, to take concrete steps to end their suffering.”

According to the agreement, the two sides must return all their military units to the barracks, and all foreign troops must leave Libya within three months. It has been agreed that a joint police force will take over control of the disputed areas.

Two days ago, representatives of the Faiz al-Siraj government and militias affiliated with General Haftar agreed to reopen air and air routes between the disputed areas, centered in Tripoli and Benghazi. Now, after a permanent ceasefire agreement, the parties want to decide on issues such as oil extraction, increasing production, and confronting internal and external perpetrators of hatred and incitement to violence on social media.

Issue Negotiations Are Scheduled for November in Tunisia.

The European Union (EU) has welcomed the deal, with EU foreign policy chief Joseph Borrell calling it a precondition for strengthening European support for Libya.

The UN Secretary-General António Guterres welcomed the ceasefire: “I congratulate the parties for putting the interest of their nation ahead of their differences. Too many people have suffered for too long. Too many men, women, and children have died as a result of the conflict”, said the UN chief.

Acting Special Representative of the Secretary-General Stephanie Williams

At the same time, the Turkish president expressed doubts about the establishment and sustainability of the ceasefire. Erdogan, who supports the central government of Faizal Seraj, did not consider the agreement to be at the level of high-ranking officials, adding that its stability will be determined in the coming days.

The international community recognizes the Al-Siraj government as the legitimate government of Libya. Turkey and Qatar support the central government in western Libya, and the UAE, Egypt, and Russia support General Haftar’s forces and the transitional government of Abdullah Thani in Benghazi.

Two months ago, Siraj and Haftar called on their forces to renounce any military conflict in order to establish civilian areas in the strategic Mediterranean city of Sirte to host peace talks.

On August 21, Faiz al-Siraj ordered the country’s military to immediately cease fire and halt all military operations, saying the ceasefire would take place when Sirte and Al-Jafra were disarmed. The ceasefire included the resumption of oil production and exports and, the departure of foreign mercenaries from Libya.

On September 7, the two sides began five-day talks in Morocco to share power and areas under their influence. Since the overthrow of Muammar Gaddafi in Libya nine years ago, the country has been the scene of civil war and bloody clashes between dozens of rival military and paramilitary groups. None of the international efforts to bring peace to the warring parties have succeeded during this period.

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George Mtimba

George clarifies how the news is changing the world, how world news trends affect you. Also, George is a professional journalist, a freelance news reporter and writer who is passionate with current world news.

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