Maduro Orders EU Ambassador to Leave Venezuela

  • “Who are they to try to impose themselves with threats?” he asked. 
  • He also protested the European leaders’ endorsement of opposition leader Juan Guaidó as Venezuela’s interim president.
  • In November 2017, Venezuela became the first Latin American country sanctioned by the EU.

Venezuela’s president, Nicolás Maduro, has ordered the European Union (EU) ambassador in Caracas, Isabel Brilhante Pedrosa, to leave the country within 72 hours. Maduro gave the order on Monday following Brussels’ imposition of sanctions on 11 Venezuelan officials.

During the crisis in Venezuela, governments of the United States, the European Union, Canada, Mexico, Panama and Switzerland applied individual sanctions against people associated with the administration of Nicolás Maduro. These sanctions included freezing of individuals’ accounts and assets, prohibiting of transactions with sanctioned parties, seizing of assets, arms embargoes and travel bans.

“Who are they to try to impose themselves with threats?” he asked. “Enough, enough. This is why I have decided to give 72 hours to the European Union ambassador in Caracas to leave our country, and we demand respect from the European Union.”

“Enough of European colonialism against Venezuela! Enough!  We’ll even loan you a plane so you can leave.” Maduro went on, “if they can’t respect Venezuela, then they should leave it.”

He also protested the European leaders’ endorsement of opposition leader Juan Guaidó as Venezuela’s interim president. “They recognize a puppet as president,” said Maduro in a televised speech.

Maduro regretted that the European bloc has launched sanctions against Venezuelans who are part of state institutions and defend the Constitution. He said that the EU sanctioned the board of the National Assembly of the opposition (AN) because of their refusal to execute orders from the EU embassy in reference to the sanctions against Luis Parra.

Parra is a dissident opponent turned ally of Maduro, and was elected President of the National Assembly with the votes of Maduro’s United Socialist Party of Venezuela, in an election contested by opposition forces loyal to Juan Guaidó.

Luis Parra is a Venezuelan politician who is in a dispute with Juan Guaidó over who is the President of the National Assembly of Venezuela based on a vote on 5 January 2020. The United States Department of the Treasury sanctioned Parra and other seven individuals, “who, at the bidding of Maduro, attempted to block the democratic process in Venezuela,” according to US Secretary of Treasury Steven Mnuchin on 13 January 2020.

The president also protested the fact that opposition politician Leopoldo López, of the People’s Will Party, used the Spanish embassy, ​​where he took refuge in April last year after a failed coup attempt, to plan for the military maritime raid failed on May 3.

Maduro also hit out at Spain’s ambassador to Caracas, Jesus Silva, accusing him of participating in the failed April 2019 bid to overthrow him, led by Lopez, and the botched raid in May that aimed at his capture. Maduro said that Silva’s collusion with Lopez is a crime. He said that Venezuela will consider taking diplomatic actions in relation to Silva’s situation in the country.

According to Maduro, the European Union actions are guided by the plans of the President of the United States, Donald Trump. Maduro said that it was a pity for 27 countries, a continent with great economic, military, political power, to kneel before Trump and his aggression policies.

Among the officials that were slammed by the sanctions is Parra. He was declared head of the National Assembly during a chaotic session in January, after troops blocked Guaido from entering the chamber. Guaido, however, held a rival vote in which 100 legislators backed him for re-election in the 167 seat legislature.

In November 2017, Venezuela became the first Latin American country sanctioned by the EU. So far, 36 Venezuelans have been subject to restrictive measures by Brussels.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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