Mali’s Opposition Rejects Transition Talks

  • The opposition leaders who attended three days of talks are accusing the military junta of planning to take power using force through a cover up of the transition talks.
  • According to the adopted transition charter the president will either be from the military or a civilian.
  • Experts have argued that the tensions between the Movement and the military could further worsen the political instability in the country.

Mali’s opposition has rejected the call to have military personnel as their transitional head of state. The June 5 Movement, leading the opposition, who attended three days of talks, are accusing the military junta of planning to take power using force through a cover up of the transition talks.

Assimi Goita, the president of the National Committee for the Salvation of the People (NCSP).

The June 5 Movement added that the resolutions do not reflect the will of the people of Mali. According to the adopted transition charter the president will either be from the military or a civilian. It is alleged that a majority of those who attended the talks had opted for a civilian leader.

The option has led to mixed reactions with a group supporting a military leader arguing that he will be able to clear the messes by earlier regimes while those against saying it will worsen the instability in the country.

There has been a growing rift between the June 5 Movement and the military since the August 18 coup. The supporters of the movement are alleged to have clashed with the police on the first day of the second consultative meeting. The movement has over time claimed that the military wants to take the revolution from them.

In an initial meeting scheduled by the military that was postponed, the group had not been invited, but it was in attendance in the opening ceremony. Experts have argued that the tensions between the Movement and the military could further worsen the political instability in the country.

Since June, the country has experienced protests organized by the opposition that called for the president’s resignation. At one time, the anti-government demonstrations turned chaotic, leaving eleven people dead and around 150 others injured.

The transition meeting resolved that the country will be led by a president and a vice president during the transition period, expected to last 18 months. The two leaders will be appointed by a commission set up by the National Committee for the Salvation of the People (NCSP).

Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta, often known by his initials IBK, is a Malian politician who served as the president of Mali from September 2013 to August 2020, when he was forced to resign in the 2020 Malian coup d’état.

The transition government will then comprise of 25 members who will be led by the Prime Minister, who will be elected by the transitional president, as per the country’s current constitution. A legislative body consisting of 121 National Council members drawn from the political parties will also be formed.

 

The August coup was received jubilantly, with many of the Malian citizens seeing it as an opportunity to redeem the country, but a good number are losing hope following the twists. On August 18, President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita was forced to resign after the military detained him and other senior government officials.

Since then, pressure has been mounting on the military to name a transitional leader. Many of the leaders expressed their concerns of a possible surge in militant attack, a situation that could further cripple the efforts to fight insurgent in the greater Sahel region.

The country has, over the years, been battling violence from insurgents, something that has spread to neighboring countries and has also greatly affected the growth of the country.

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Juliet Norah

I am a freelance journalist is passionate about news. I derive pleasure in informing people about the happenings in the world

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