Morales Calls for Pope, UN, Europe to Mediate in Bolivia

  • "I ask international organizations . . . to join our dialogue to pacify our beloved Bolivia."
  • At a press briefing in Mexico City, where he was received as a political asylum, Morales proposed a national dialogue to contain the clashes in Bolivia.
  • "The OAS is not at the service of the Latin American peoples and less of its social movements. It is at the service of the U.S. empire."

Former Bolivian President Evo Morales called on Wednesday for the United Nations (UN), European countries and Pope Francis to mediate between the warring parties in Bolivia, in a text, he published on the social media platform, Twitter.

Evo Morales is a Bolivian politician and former cocalero activist who served as the 80th President of Bolivia from 2006 to 2019. On November 10, 2019, he resigned amidst significant unrest in the wake of a report by the Organization of American States alleging his government had rigged the year’s elections.

“I ask international organizations, such as the UN, friendly European countries and the Catholic Church represented by brother Pope Francis, to join our dialogue to pacify our beloved Bolivia. Violence poses a threat to life and social peace,” Morales tweeted.

Earlier, the former Bolivian president had proposed, while speaking to a Uruguayan radio station, the presence of former rulers, such as Uruguayan Jose Mujica and Spanish Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, in the mediation to help “in pacifying Bolivia”. In the interview, he defended his administration and stated that, legally, he remains president of Bolivia, as the Bolivian Parliament has not formalized his resignation.

At a press briefing in Mexico City, where he was received as a political asylum, Morales proposed a national dialogue to contain the clashes in Bolivia, with the participation of civil society, and “politicians who lost elections and social movements in different sectors.” The former president said the dialogue could be accompanied “by friendly countries and international organizations.” He said he was willing to return to his country “if the (Bolivian) people asked,” and to contribute to pacification. He emphasized that “if there is no national dialogue it will be difficult to stop this confrontation.”

Jeanine Áñez is a Bolivian politician and lawyer who has served as a senator for Beni since 2010. In November 2019, following the resignation of Evo Morales, Áñez declared herself interim president.

He again accused the Organization of American States (OAS) of contributing to the crisis in Bolivia. “The OAS is not at the service of the Latin American peoples and less of its social movements. It is at the service of the U.S. empire,” said the former president. Morales claimed that when the opposition and the OAS accused him of fraudulent elections, he considered it “no problem” for international organizations and institutions to verify the fairness of the process. However, he said he saw a suspicious attitude in the way the entity acted. He added that if it was determined that he did not win in the first round, “then, in compliance with the rules and the constitution, there is a second round.”

Jeanine Añez, second vice president of the Senate and senator of a Bolivian opposition party declared herself interim president of the country. The Constitutional Court approved her ascension to power. Añez, 52, is expected to organize new elections within 90 days. On Wednesday, she unveiled her cabinet of ministers, most of whom are politicians from Santa Cruz, the traditional opposition electoral stronghold.

Morales resigned as president last Sunday after the OAS denounced alleged irregularities in the election in which the then-president was re-elected for a fourth consecutive term. His participation in the elections was authorized by the Constitutional Court, although the nation’s Constitution itself prohibits a president to a limit of two consecutive terms.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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