Muslim Countries Condemn Attack in Nice

  • Several Arab states, through their foreign ministries, condemned the attack.
  • Iran has also joined its fellow Islamic countries in condemning the Nice attacks.
  • In recent days, reactions from the Muslim world against France and its President, Emmanuel Macron, have increased tremendously.

Quite a number of Arab countries, including Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Jordan, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), have strongly condemned Thursday’s terror attack in a church in Nice, southern France, and disassociated it from the values ​​of Islam. Each country put out a statement through their Ministries of Foreign Affairs.

Security forces guard the area after a reported knife attack at Notre Dame church, in Nice on October 29, 2020.

In a statement, Saudi Arabia’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs “strongly” condemned the “terrorist attack,” which resulted in three deaths, and stressed that terrorist acts are contrary to all religions and creeds.

“The kingdom categorically rejects such extremist acts, which contravene all religions . . . while stressing the importance of avoiding all practices which generate hatred, violence and extremism.”

Also, in a statement, Egypt’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs condemned the attack in France, the third in just over a month. Just like Saudi Arabia, Egypt maintained that terrorist activities are contrary to the teachings of all religions.

The same arguments and positions were advanced by the UAE, Qatar, and Bahrain, who also condemned the attack. They stressed that they reject “all forms of violence, extremism, and terrorism, whatever the reasons.”

Kuwait’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs also condemned the attack and stressed the need to “double international efforts” to reject any practice of generating hatred among peoples and fueling extremism and terrorism.

Jordan has also condemned the attack in southern France. The country’s foreign affairs Ministry spokesman, Ambassador Dhaifallah Ali al-Fayez, on Thursday denounced the “terrorist crime.” He criticized all crimes that “aim to destabilize security and stability and are inconsistent with religious and humanitarian values ​​and principles.”

Iran “Firmly” Condemns Killing in Nice

French President Emmanuel Macron speaks to the media during the visit to the scene of a knife attack at Notre Dame church in Nice on October 29.

Iran has also joined its fellow Islamic countries in condemning the Nice attacks. Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif tweeted, “we strongly condemn today’s terrorist attack in Nice.” He added:

“This escalating vicious cycle-hate speech, provocations & violence-must be replaced by reason & sanity. We should recognize that radicalism breads more radicalism, and peace cannot be achieved with ugly provocation.”

Three people, including two women, were stabbed to death on Thursday by a young man in a church in central Nice. 

In recent days, reactions from the Muslim world against France and its President, Emmanuel Macron, have increased tremendously. The French President declared that he would continue to defend freedom of expression, including the publication of cartoons, during a national tribute to a history professor who was beheaded by a young Islamic terrorist.

The professor had allegedly displayed the controversial Charlie Hebdo cartoons to his students during a lesson, something that angered the Muslim community. The professor, Samuel Paty, was beheaded on the 16th of this month in the northern Paris suburb of Éragny.

The good thing, however, is that the very Islamic countries that were critical of the French President’s tough stance on terrorism are now in strong condemnation of terrorism activities, and disassociating them from Islam in general. It is a move that can contribute immensely in the war on terrorism across the globe.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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