Netanyahu Plotting Dissolution, November Elections?

  • Prime Minister Netanyahu has allegedly decided not to approve the 2020 state budget by its deadline, therefore triggering new parliamentary elections in November.
  • Three parliamentary elections in less than a year failed to produce a clear winner.
  • Netanyahu is facing three cases on charges of fraud, bribery, and breach of trust.

So what’s Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu up to? Well, a section of Israel’s local media have reported that sources close to the country’s premier have leaked information to the effect that the veteran ruler is keen on dissolving the coalition government currently governing the nation. 

Legislative elections were held in Israel on 2 March 2020 to elect members of the twenty-third Knesset. They were the third snap elections to be held within a year, after two inconclusive elections in April and September 2019.

As per the authoritative sources, Prime Minister Netanyahu has allegedly decided not to approve the 2020 state budget by its deadline, therefore triggering new parliamentary elections in November this year. That was according to Israeli daily Haaretz, which reported the story on Wednesday.

His apparent decision not to approve the country’s budget by the August deadline creates a feeling that there is chaos in the coalition government, and he will seek public support for its breakup.

The report further says that Netanyahu made the decision after the Jerusalem District Court ruled that in January 2021, it will begin to hear witness testimonies in the criminal cases that he is facing. That issue is probably also informing the veteran leader’s current scheme.

The Israeli coalition government, currently led by Netanyahu, in partnership with his political rival turned political collaborator, Benny Gantz, was formed on May 17 to end Israel’s longest political crisis. Three parliamentary elections in less than a year failed to produce a clear winner.

After lengthy negotiations, the unique government agreement in May won a parliamentary majority. As per the arrangement, Netanyahu is to serve as head of government for the first year and a half, after which his coalition partner, Gantz, would automatically succeed him.

At the time of the constitution of the coalition government, Netanyahu explained in his speech before the Israeli Knesset that the two leaders had decided to put aside their divisions and joined hands to face the challenges that the coronavirus pandemic poses to Israel in matters of health, economy and society.

On 21 November 2019, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was officially indicted for breach of trust, accepting bribes and fraud. His trial was scheduled to begin on May 24.

The country’s opposition was, however, not in full agreement with the decision. They occasionally interrupted Netanyahu’s speech with boos and jeers, while accusing him of being a corrupt leader.

Gantz, for his part, defended the formation of the coalition at the time. Gantz explained that it was aimed at avoiding a fourth election, despite the fact that he had based his electoral campaigns on ousting Netanyahu, and indicated that he won’t agree to govern with a defendant for corruption.

Furthermore, Gantz emphasized that the alternative to the unity government was “a kind of civil war,” and appealed to reconciliation and to building mechanisms of trust between him and “Bibi.” In addition he sought to heal the divisions between the ideological blocs of the right and center, which make up the coalition.

Netanyahu is facing three cases on charges of fraud, bribery, and breach of trust. The unique government agreement formation, nonetheless, won the approval of a majority of the Israel parliament.

The arrangement would probably not happen again, in the event that new elections are held, Netanyahu, the current head of government, is attempting once again to get a majority.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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