New Russian Government Appointments are a Farce – What’s New?

  • Russian government appointments, key Putin supporters kept their portfolios.
  • The musical chairs farce continues.
  • The vote on the proposed Russian constitution ammendments is supposed to take place prior to May 1, 2020.

The new, not so new, Russian government appointments were announced. Russian President Vladimir Putin’s speech was followed by the resignation of the Russian Prime Minister Dimitry Medvedev and his cabinet. Putin desires to amend the Russian constitution that was created in 1993, two years after the Soviet Union collapsed in the 1991. The vote about the newly proposed amendments is expected to occur before May 1, 2020.

The date is symbolic as it signifies Spring and Labor Day. In 1918, May 1 (May Day) became an important public holiday, known as the Day of the International Solidarity of Workers, in the Soviet Union. Most Soviet cities had parades and obligatory workers’ marches on this day until 1990. The Russian Parliament renamed the holiday as Spring and Labor Day in 1992.

The new Russian government appointments have been announced:

  • In accordance with paragraph “d” of article 83 of the Constitution of the Russian Federation, appoint Andrei Belousov as the First Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation, relieving him of his prior post as Minister of Economic Development.
  • Appoint Dmitry Grigorenko as Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation Chief of Staff of the Government of the Russian Federation.  He is former vice of the Federal Tax Services.
  • Appoint Yuri Trutnev as Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation-Plenipotentiary representative of the President of the Russian Federation in the far Eastern Federal district. Will keep his role as the president’s representative in the Dalneyvostok district.
  • Appoint Victoria Abramchenko V. Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Russian Federation. She is former head of the government registry services.
  • Appoint Yuri Borisov as Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation (Former vice in the defense sector agency).
  • Appoint Tatyana Golikova as Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation (Former vice of social policy).
  • Appoint Alexey Logvinovich Overchuk as Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation (Former vice of federal tax services).
  • Appoint Marat Shakirzyanovich Khusnullin as Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation (Former minister of construction in development in Tatarstan).
  • Appoint Dmitry Chernyshenko as Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation. Former president of the Sochi 2014 Olympic and Paralympic committee.
  • Appoint Vladimir Kolokoltsev as Minister of Internal Affairs of the Russian Federation. Remains with the same portfolio.
  • Appoint Yevgeny Zinichev as the Minister Of the Russian Federation for civil defense, emergency situations and elimination of consequences of natural disasters. Remains with the same portfolio.
  • Appoint Sergey V. Lavrov as Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation. Remains with the same portfolio.
  • Appoint Shoigu Sergey Kuzhugetovich as the Minister of Defense of the Russian Federation. Remains with the same portfolio.
  • Appoint Konstantin Chuichenko as Minister of Justice of the Russian Federation.  Remains with the same portfolio.
  • Appoint Mikhail Murashko as Minister of Health of the Russian Federation. Former Head of the health care control agency.
  • Appoint Olga Lyubimova as Minister of Culture of the Russian Federation. Former Head of the cinematography department within Cultural Ministry.
  • Appoint Valery Falkov as the Minister of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation. Former University staff.
  • Appoint Dmitry Kobylkin as the Minister of Natural Resources and Ecology of the Russian Federation. Same Portfolio.
  • Appoint Denis Manturov as Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation. Same portfolio.
  • Appoint Sergey Kravtsov As Minister of Education of the Russian Federation. Former head of Rosbornadzor.
  • Appoint Alexander Kozlov as the Minister Of the Russian Federation for the development of the Far East and the Arctic. Same portfolio.
  • Appoint Dmitry Patrushev as Minister of Agriculture of the Russian Federation. Same portfolio.
  • Appoint Oleg Matytsin as the Minister of Sports of the Russian Federation. Former Head of FISU (University Sports).
  • Appoint Vladimir Yakushev as the Minister of Construction and Housing and Communal Services of the Russian Federation. Same portfolio.
  • Appoint Yevgeny Ivanovich  Dietrich as Minister of Transport of the Russian Federation. Same portfolio.
  • Appoint Anton Kotyakov as the Minister of Labor and Social Protection of the Russian Federation. Former Vice Minister of Finance.
  • Appoint Anton Siluanov as Minister of Finance of the Russian Federation. Same portfolio.
  • Appoint Maksut Igorevich Shadaev as the Minister of Digital Development, Communications and Mass Communications of the Russian Federation. Former head of the information politics and social media in the presidents’ office.

Overall, it is yet another farce with musical chairs. Dmitry Medvedev’s resignation was yet another stunt. It was his time to go, after being a good submissive servant to Putin and playing musical chairs to accommodate Putin’s agenda. Additionally, he created favorable grounds to be a good puppet, while he pretended to be president of Russia under his puppet master Putin.

2020 marked his exit. He was no longer useful and it was time to go. Besides the insignificant portfolio changes, the key players remained the same. The elites of Putin’s inner circle remained and the true followers are appointed to the same portfolios. However, the show of changes for the Russian people was created using political theater. Stay tuned for the next stage of farce with a public vote on the proposed changes to the Russian constitution.

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Christina Kitova

I spent most of my professional life in finance, insurance risk management litigation.

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