Nigeria Unrest- President Buhari Admits 69 Lives Lost

  • "In the mayhem that ensued, many lives had been lost and there are a number of public and private properties completely destroyed or vandalized… The mayhem has not stopped,” he said.
  • “Through all the disturbances, security agencies observed extreme restraint.” The government “will not fold its arms and allow miscreants and criminals to continue to perpetrate these acts of hooliganism," he said.
  • The government agreed to suppress the Special Anti-Theft Brigade (SARS), he said, but "the protesters refused to cancel the protest. Instead, they gradually became violent".

Following the ongoing unrest in Nigeria, 69 lives have so far been lost owing to the protests against police brutality therein especially by the SARS police unit.  It is through the announcement that the Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari was for the very first time admitting that the chaos resulted in deaths.

Protests started in Nigeria more than two weeks ago.

The announcement was made by Nigeria’s President Muhammadu Buhari on Friday. Buhari did not say whether security forces were responsible for the deaths of civilians but stressed that 11 policemen and seven soldiers were “killed by troublemakers”, bringing the total death toll to 69.

“In the mayhem that ensued, many lives had been lost and there are a number of public and private properties completely destroyed or vandalized… The mayhem has not stopped,” he said.

“Through all the disturbances, security agencies observed extreme restraint.” The government “will not fold its arms and allow miscreants and criminals to continue to perpetrate these acts of hooliganism,” he said.

Buhari made the utterances in a virtual meeting with former Nigerian leaders on the security situation in the country on Friday.

The UN and other members of the international community, however, say last Tuesday evening, security forces launched a bloody crackdown on protesters who did not adhere to the curfew in Lagos.

Amnesty International says at least 12 protesters were killed in Lagos that night alone.

Buhari noted that he had made concessions to the protesters after the demonstrations began against a special police unit known for its brutality about two weeks ago.

The government agreed to suppress the Special Anti-Theft Brigade (SARS), he said, but “the protesters refused to cancel the protest. Instead, they gradually became violent”.

Denials

One of Nigeria’s main prisons was set on fire on Thursday during the unrest.

Mostly civilians, but also police and soldiers have died in protests against police brutality.

Initially, the Lagos governor denied that there were deaths on Tuesday night, later admitting the death of a person, while the Nigerian Army called the information about the deaths “false news”. Buhari appealed for calm, but also did not mention the deaths.

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres, the European Union’s High Representative for Foreign Affairs, Josep Borrell, and United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, are among the leaders who have issued statements against the deadly violence.

Empty Lagos

This Saturday, Lagos, the largest city in Nigeria, reopened albeit cautiously after a curfew has been eased after days of unrest.

The streets in the city center were still largely deserted, even after the local governor said that people were now be allowed to leave between 8 am and 6 pm.

Sanwo-Olu also said that a judicial panel to investigate the shooting at demonstrators in downtown Lagos would start work on Monday.

Also worth noting was the fact that the police presence was less intense on the streets of the city center today, Saturday.

Only $1/click

Submit Your Ad Here

Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

Leave a Reply