Occupied Kashmir: Barriers Receded, Communication Partially Restored

  • According to reports from the Indian-administered Kashmir office, the process of removing barriers has been started.
  • News reporters have also confirmed that landline phone service can now be used in some areas of Kashmir.
  • An Indian government spokesperson said the administration and security forces are closely examining the current situation to avoid any untoward incident.

According to reports from the Indian-administered Kashmir office, the process of removing barriers has been started. After a 13-day blockade of curfew and media communications imposed in Indian-administered Kashmir in early August, a government spokesman said on Saturday that various sanctions were gradually being lifted in the valley.

Article 370 of the Indian constitution gave special status to Jammu and Kashmir—a state in India, located in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent, and a part of the larger region of Kashmir, which has been the subject of dispute between India, Pakistan, and China since 1947—allowing it to have a separate constitution, a state flag and autonomy over the internal administration of the state. The government of India revoked this special status in August 2019 through a Presidential Order and the passage of a resolution in Parliament.

Also, Principal Secretary of Indian-administered Kashmir Rohit Kansal told a press conference in Srinagar that barriers have been removed from 35 police stations and all telephone networks will be restored by Sunday evening. He added that the landline service in Jammu division is functioning normally and mobile phone service has been restored in five districts.

News reporters have also confirmed that landline phone service can now be used in some areas of Kashmir. However, mobile and Internet service in the Valley is still suspended and restricted to only in a few areas. An Indian government spokesperson said the administration and security forces are closely examining the current situation to avoid any untoward incident. He said that public transport facilities on the roads are a positive sign.

Referring to the closure of schools, offices and other educational institutions, the spokesman said that primary level schools and all government offices would be opened Monday. It should be remembered that after the UN Security Council meeting on Friday, Indian spokesman Saeed Akbaruddin had said that the sanctions in Kashmir would be abolished gradually. Demonstrations against ending the Article 370 Special Status of Jammu and Kashmir were held in different areas despite the curfew. Several Kashmir political leaders have been kept under house arrest.

Srinagar is the largest city and the summer capital of the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir. It lies in the Kashmir Valley on the banks of the Jhelum River, a tributary of the Indus, and Dal and Anchar lakes. The city is known for its natural environment, gardens, waterfronts and houseboats. It is also known for traditional Kashmiri handicrafts and dried fruits. It is the northernmost city of India with over one million people.

India’s Kashmir ground situation on Friday

In the city ​Srinagar last Friday, several people were killed when authorities fired on protesters during mass demonstrations. The Indian government denied the incident, but a few days later admitted that the demonstrations had taken place.

All roads were closed in ​Srinagar with barricades and barriers and the city is filled with a large number of security officials. After the Friday prayers on August 16, a large number of protesters went out and made peace with themselves, and after the completion of it, everyone left.

However, fires and tear gas were also heard from somewhere nearby, while in some places Pakistani songs were heard. In some places, loudspeakers were sending messages to people to attend the demonstration. There were situations where people’s emotions were turning into anger rather than fear and it was only increasing.

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Joyce Davis

My history goes back to 2002 and I  worked as a reporter, interviewer, news editor, copy editor, managing editor, newsletter founder, almanac profiler, and news radio broadcaster.


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