Plot to Assassinate Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan Foiled

  • A wave of dissatisfaction with the Armenian government's actions sparked widespread protests in Yerevan and elsewhere.
  • The report states that the Pashinian assassination plot was aimed at seizing political powe.
  • A group planned to assassinate him because of dissatisfaction with Pashinyan's performance in the field of foreign policy.

Armenia’s National Security Service has foiled the assassination attempt on Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan. Some are said to have been arrested in connection with the Pashinian assassination plot, and an ammunition depot has been discovered by security forces.

Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan

Following the agreement reached between Armenia and Azerbaijan on Monday (November 9th) over the Nagorno-Karabakh crisis, a wave of dissatisfaction with the Armenian government’s actions sparked widespread protests in Yerevan and elsewhere.

It is now said that a group planned to assassinate him because of dissatisfaction with Pashinyan’s performance in the field of foreign policy.

On Sunday, November 15, news sources published a report from Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, announcing that the Pashinyan assassination plot had been foiled.

This report is based on information provided by the Armenian National Security Service. The time of this program is announced on the evening of Saturday, November 14th.

The news of the assassination attempt on Nikol Pashinyan was announced by the Russian news agency Tass. The report of this news agency has not published more information about the identities of the perpetrators of this assassination.

“The suspects were planning to illegally usurp power by murdering the prime minister and there were already potential candidates being discussed to replace him,” said the NSS in a statement.

The report states that the Pashinian assassination plot was aimed at seizing political power, and that the organizers of the plot also pursued a political control program in Armenia.

The group was dissatisfied with Pashinyan’s performance in both domestic and foreign policy. The report states that individuals have been arrested in connection with the plot and their ammunition depots have been seized.

It should be noted that the signing of the ceasefire agreement by the Armenian government and the withdrawal of the country from part of the Nagorno-Karabakh region has caused dissatisfaction among the people.

Failure to Try to Find a Peaceful olution

The Republic of Armenia and the Republic of Nagorno-Karabakh are among the losers in this war. But it must be added that it is international diplomacy that has failed as a result of this agreement.

The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) has been working for about 30 years to find a peaceful solution to the Nagorno-Karabakh crisis. But these efforts have not been successful.

In 1994, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) postponed resolving the Nagorno-Karabakh crisis. The war between Armenia and Azerbaijan ended without achieving a lasting political solution.

Nagorno-Karabakh war

The Minsk Group, made up of Russia, the United States and France, hailed the end of the war in the South Caucasus as a victory. But over time, the group’s power and influence in resolving the Nagorno-Karabakh crisis diminished.

Numerous attempts to find a peaceful solution were either opposed by Azerbaijan or opposed by Armenia.

The issue continued until the Republic of Azerbaijan gained enough military power to find a military solution to the Nagorno-Karabakh crisis.

Aliyev has also made this clear. He is now taking a triumphant step, leaving only the ruins of the West’s efforts to find a peaceful solution.

When the flames of the Nagorno-Karabakh war flared up again in late September, the OSCE’s efforts were limited to making phone calls and advising on ending the conflict. But if diplomacy pursues its goals only half-heartedly, then only failure awaits it.
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Benedict Kasigara

I have been working as a freelance editor/writer since 2006. My specialist subject is film and television having worked for over 10 years from 2005 during which time I was the editor of the BFI Film and Television.

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