Protesters in Yerevan Demand Pashinyan’s Resignation

  • Thousands of Yerevan residents left their homes and rushed to Republic Square, where the government building is located.
  • It is not known exactly where Pashinyan is, although he claims to still be in Yerevan.
  • "Nobody could have expected this," said an outraged Yerevan taxi driver named Kamo.

After the leaders of Armenia, Azerbaijan and Russia signed a ceasefire declaration in Nagorno-Karabakh, mass unrest broke out in Yerevan. Protesters are pushing for the resignation of Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan. On the night of November 10, no one slept in Yerevan.

Protesters react inside Parliament, after Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan said he had signed an agreement with leaders of Russia and Azerbaijan.

Immediately after the appearance of the text of a joint statement by the Prime Minister of Armenia and the Presidents of Azerbaijan and Russia, which spoke about the cessation of hostilities in Nagorno-Karabakh and its conditions, thousands of Yerevan residents left their homes and rushed to Republic Square, where the government building is located.

The protesters managed to break into the building without actually meeting any resistance from the guards. Outraged people smashed the government meeting room and the cabinet of Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan.

“The reaction to this declaration of an end to the war in Armenia has been greeted with what appears to be absolute disgust and despair,” said Robin Forestier-Walker, Al Jazeera’s correspondent in Tbilisi, in neighbouring Georgia

Mass Protests Continue in Yerevan

By morning, the situation had not calmed down, despite the fact that representatives of the Ministry of Defense and the General Staff of the Armed Forces of Armenia spoke, who called on everyone to “build an incomparably strong and efficient army” and refrain from actions that could “undermine the foundations of statehood.”

Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan went live on Facebook three times during the night. He called on the people to consolidate around the Armenian state. It is not known exactly where Pashinyan is. He himself assured that he did not leave Yerevan.

Meanwhile, there were more and more people on the streets of the city. Some of them went to the capitol and occupied its conference room. At the same time, the Speaker of the Parliament, Ararat Mirzoyan, was beaten and ended up in the hospital.

The protesters demanded the immediate resignation of the Prime Minister and his government, as well as the withdrawal of the signature of the Armenian side on the document signed by the leaders of Azerbaijan, Armenia and Russia.

All who came to parliament expressed confidence that Pashinyan had actually surrendered Karabakh, thereby betraying the people who had brought him to power two and a half years ago.

Pashinyan Surrendered?

Protesters react inside Parliament, after Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan said he had signed an agreement with leaders of Russia and Azerbaijan.

“Nobody could have expected this,” an outraged Yerevan taxi driver named Kamo, who also came to the parliament to express no confidence in Nikol Pashinyan said.

“Young guys are dying at the frontline, betrayal is taking place behind them. Meanwhile, MPs from the pro-government majority are in no hurry to enter parliament, although the people gathered near the building promised that ‘they will not be touched.'”

Since the morning it has not been possible to secure a quorum, and so far only the leaders of Prosperous Armenia, Gagik Tsarukyan, and Bright Armenia, Edmon Marukyan, are in the parliamentary session.

According to the expert on regional issues, Manvel Gumashyan, the ceasefire agreement in Karabakh is perceived by many in Armenia as a surrender. It significantly hit the rating of the authorities.

“The price for all of that is Russian troops on the ground in the form of peacekeepers and that may become an irritant in the Russian-Azerbaijani relationship over time,” said Laurence Broers, an associate fellow for Russia and Eurasia at Chatham House.

“Russia has reasserted itself quite convincingly in the short to medium term but over the long term, this peacekeeping operation may start to look like an occupying force.”

“What Russia has done is to essentially commit to a peacekeeping operation but without a political process or a fully fledged peace process to legitimate that process.”

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Joyce Davis

My history goes back to 2002 and I  worked as a reporter, interviewer, news editor, copy editor, managing editor, newsletter founder, almanac profiler, and news radio broadcaster.

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