Russia — Putin Keeping Very Close Watch On Navalny

  • The commission's Secretary General Alexei Melnikov told Russia's Interfax news agency that Navalny will first be quarantined before being transferred to one of the region's prisons.
  • Navalny will be transferred to a jail in the small town of Pokrov, in the Vladimir region, in European Russia, sources told the media.
  • Convicted persons in Russia are usually transported for days or weeks in special wagons, a process known as “ etapírovanie ” and which is highly criticized by human rights defenders for its lack of humanity.

Alexei Navalny, arrived Sunday in a region 200 kilometers east of Moscow to be admitted to a prison where he will serve his sentence. The Moscow public surveillance commission said in a statement that Alexei Navalny had been moved to an establishment of the Russian penitentiary services in the Vladimir region.

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny attends a hearing to consider an appeal against an earlier court decision to change his suspended sentence to a real prison term in Moscow on February 20.

The commission’s Secretary General Alexei Melnikov told Russia’s Interfax news agency that Navalny will first be quarantined before being transferred to one of the region’s prisons. Navalny will be transferred to a jail in the small town of Pokrov, in the Vladimir region, in European Russia, sources told the media.

Convicted persons in Russia are usually transported for days or weeks in special wagons, a process known as “ etapírovanie ” and which is highly criticized by human rights defenders for its lack of humanity. The transfer can last for weeks or even months since the distances in Russia can be thousands of kilometers, for which the prisoners make stops and posts in special preventive prisons spread throughout the national penitentiary geography.

During this process, the inmates remain incommunicado, while the law does not oblige the authorities to notify the families of their whereabouts until they reach their respective new destinations.

Last Friday, the head of the Russian prison services, Alexander Kalashnikov, announced that Navalny had already been relocated. “He has been transferred to where he is supposed to be under the court ruling,” state news agency RIA Novosti quoted Alexander Kalashnikov.

Kalashnikov did not disclose the name of the prison but insisted that Navalny would serve his sentence in “absolutely normal conditions.” “I guarantee that there exists no threat to his life and health,” he added.

Russian court ordered opposition leader Alexei Navalny to serve more than two years in prison.

On Thursday, Navalny’s lawyers and relatives announced his release from the Moscow detention center where he had been detained since his arrest.

The European Union reported this week that it will adopt new sanctions against Russia for the conviction of Navalny, who was poisoned in August 2020 in Siberia with the chemical agent Novichok, after which he was in a coma for two and a half weeks in a German hospital.

Navalny accuses Russian President Vladimir Putin of ordering the Federal Security Service (FSB, former KGB) to assassinate him.

Russian justice last week confirmed the sentence of the 44-year-old anti-corruption activist in a fraud case dating back to 2014 that he, and many Western capitals and NGOs, denounce as politically motivated.

Navalny was arrested on January 17 upon his return from Germany, where he had spent nearly five months recovering from a poisoning that he accuses the Kremlin of being behind. The activist was also fined for “defamation” and is awaiting further trials and an investigation for fraud, punishable by ten years in prison.

Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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