Spain Anti-Coronavirus Quarantine and Violent Protests

  • The youth, dissatisfied with the quarantine measures, demanded the immediate resignation of the government, both central and regional.
  • During clashes with the police, who used batons against the protesters, more than 30 people were injured, including 20 policemen.
  • Spain is one of the countries most affected by the pandemic.

In the cities of Spain, radical youth are violently protesting against tough quarantine measures and in their opinion the lack of proper government assistance to the unemployed. The most violent clashes with the police against the Spanish quarantine measures took place in Barcelona.

Police take security measures during a check for document as the Spanish government imposed a 15-day state of emergency in the region of Madrid

In Barcelona city on the night from Friday to Saturday, October 31, hundreds of young people barricaded the streets, set fire to garbage containers and cars, including police vans, smashed and robbed shops, threw stones and bottles at the police.

The youth, dissatisfied with the quarantine measures, demanded the immediate resignation of the government, both central and regional.

During clashes with the police, who used batons against the protesters, more than 30 people were injured, including 20 policemen. Dozens of protesters were detained.

In the center of Burgos, the demonstration under anti-quarantine slogans was initially peaceful, but then hundreds of aggressive young people armed with stones and sticks attacked the police special forces.

The police were forced to retreat under the onslaught of the crowd. The damage to municipalities and individuals – due to pogroms and arson – is estimated in millions of euros.

No less violent clashes occurred between protesters and the forces of law and order in the cities of Cantabria, in northern Spain, including in the provincial capital, Santander. Eight people were detained there on charges of “attempted murder of police officers, disobedience to the authorities and causing damage to the city economy.”

In the city of Zaragoza, the capital of Aragon, five protesters were imprisoned for similar acts. Riots were also noted in the Basque city of Bilbao, where anti-quarantine slogans were accompanied by demands for the independence of the Basque Country from Spain.

Protests in Spain – Not Only Against Quarantine

Spanish Clash between Police and civilians.

According to the surveyed sociologist Encarnación Vaquero, the protesting youth is “not only dissatisfied with the strict quarantine measures” – the imposition of a curfew, restrictions on freedom of movement, the ability to gather in companies no more than 6 people, the obligation to wear protective masks and other restrictions. The population is irritated by the lack of proper government assistance to people who have lost their jobs due to the pandemic.

Spanish Judiciary Council &  ex-member of the Catalan Parliament  Alfons López Tena tweeted: “A mix of far-left, far-right, and negationists, attack the Catalan police in protest against COVID restrictions ordered by Catalonia’s government.”

The protesters are dissatisfied, in particular, with the chaotic, in their opinion, the nature of the quarantine measures, when these measures are introduced and then canceled, the confusion in the statistics of the dead, as well as the high fines that are imposed on quarantine violators – from 100 to tens of thousands of euros.

Spain is one of the countries most affected by the pandemic. Since March 2020, at least 1,200,000 people have been infected there. According to the government, 29,000 have died, although even the Ministry of Health does not exclude that the number of victims may be significantly higher. Over the past day, about 10,000 people have been infected with the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus in Spain.

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Benedict Kasigara

I have been working as a freelance editor/writer since 2006. My specialist subject is film and television having worked for over 10 years from 2005 during which time I was the editor of the BFI Film and Television.

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