Sudan: Army and Civilian Leadership Sign Historic Power-sharing Deal

  • The agreement was signed at a colorful ceremony in the country's capital city, Khartoum, and was graced by heads of state, prime ministers, and other dignitaries from several countries.
  • The political crisis has not only resulted in the loss of hundreds of Sudanese lives, but also led to massive destruction of property, and destabilization of the country's economy.
  • The agreement provides for alternating power-sharing between the army and the civilians during a transition phase that will last for three years and three months.

Leaders of Sudan’s Transitional Military Council, and their civilian opposition counterparts, have today officially signed a historic agreement widely viewed as an eventual possible solution to the major political crisis that has rocked the oil-rich African state for the past eight months.

The political crisis has not only resulted in the loss of hundreds of Sudanese lives, but also led to massive destruction of property, and destabilization of the country’s economy.

The agreement was signed at a colorful ceremony in the country’s capital city, Khartoum, and was graced by heads of state, prime ministers, and other dignitaries from several countries.

Sudanese celebrate the signing of a power-sharing agreement between the military and civilian authorities.

The signatories of the agreement were; Mohammed Hamdan Daglo said Hemedeti, No. 2 of the Military Council, and Ahmed Al-Rabie, representative of the Alliance for Freedom and Change (ALC), representing the civilians.

The agreement provides for alternating power-sharing between the army and the civilians during a transition phase that will last for three years and three months. This will lead to the organization of national elections.  During this transition period, Sudan will be Governed by a “Sovereign Council,” which will be composed of eleven members, i.e., six civilians members, and five members from the army. The names of the members will be announced tomorrow, Sunday.

An army representative will chair the council for the next 21 months, before being replaced by a civilian for the next 18 months. Abdallah Hamdok, a former UN economist, has been nominated by the civilians to become prime minister of the future transitional government.

The composition of the transitional government is expected to be unveiled on August 28, when 18 ministers will be appointed by civilians while the Transitional Military Council will appoint the ministers of defense and interior.

Celebrations broke out all over the country at the news of the agreement.

The agreement, brokered by Ethiopia and the African Union, comes into effect after several months of tension, before and following the ouster of the then-President, Omar El-Bashir in April, by the army. The army’s overthrow of Bashir was effected by massive demonstrations in the country by civilians, following the government’s decision to triple the price of bread amidst an economic crisis in December. Subsequently, the military tried to usurp the country’s leadership completely, a move that heightened chaos and tensions in Sudan. Tensions peaked in early June, when the Sudanese army suppressed a sit-in of protesters in front of the army headquarters, killing over 130 people following the turmoil that ensued.

The signing of the agreement represents the end of a painful eight-month chapter for the Sudanese. Bashir had been at the helm of the country’s leadership, ruling it with an iron fist for thirty years, after taking power in 1989.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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