Sydney Faces “Catastrophic” Threat as Fires Rage

Australian оffісіаlѕ have wаrnеd оf thе роtеntіаl “catastrophic” thrеаt роѕеd bу natural fіrеѕ in the ѕuburbѕ of Sуdnеу, thе соuntrу’ѕ lаrgеѕt city. Vulnеrаblе residents wеrе wаrnеd to leave thе аrеа аnd ѕееk rеfugе in ѕhорріng malls. At lеаѕt thrее people have dіеd іn Auѕtrаlіа’ѕ wildfires in recent days аnd thоuѕаndѕ have flеd their hоmеѕ. On Sundау, mоrе thаn fіvе nаturаl fіrеѕ continued іn thе two states оf Nеw Sоuth Wales and Quееnѕlаnd.

Uluru Mountain Closed to Climbers After Final Friday Ascents

In Australia, Friday was the lаѕt day for tourists to climb Uluru mountain. Clіmbіng the mountain іѕ now рrоhіbіtеd іn оrdеr to hоnоr thе wіll of thе nаtіvеѕ of thе аrеа. This huge rосk, also knоwn as Aуеrѕ Rock, wіll bе реrmаnеntlу off limits begining Sаturdау. Uluru Mountain is a rеd sandstone rосk lосаtеd іn thе Nоrthеrn Territory іn сеntrаl Auѕtrаlіа. Uluru іѕ four mеtеrѕ hіgh аnd is knоwn іntеrnаtіоnаllу fоr іtѕ rеd color. Thе Uluru Rосk Mountains аrе ѕасrеd tо the Ananguѕ, natives оf thе аrеа. They hаvе long bееn саllіng fоr tоurіѕtѕ to ѕtор сlіmbіng thе rock.

What to Consider When Moving Interstate in Australia

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, during 2017-2018, almost 393,000 people moved interstate, up by 4.3% from the previous year. Further, about 43% of Australians moved their home in the past 5 years. So, moving interstate is a likely decision for most of Australia’s population. Nonetheless, whether you’re moving for lifestyle or work, just like the states vary, so do the challenges you’ll face when moving. Either way, here’s a list of the top 5 tips to guarantee a seamless relocation experience whenever you decide to change the scenery in Australia.

Frisco Search Warrant Quashed, Aussie Police Wanted Prints in Pair of Press Raids

On Thursday, a judge voided a search warrant used by the San Francisco Police Department to monitor a journalist’s phone.  The warrant was then used to gather information in advance of a controversial raid on the apartment and news operation of Bryan Carmody, who published a leaked police report and refused to divulge its source.  Meanwhile, more details are emerging down under on a similar raid on Australia’s public broadcaster.  In a troubling time worldwide for press freedoms, this week provided much-needed good news, and a dose of disinfecting daylight.

Mexico Wants to Appease Trump and Send National Guard to Southern Border

Negotiations take days in Washington- but still breakthrough is missing. If nothing happens, US tariffs will apply to all imports from Mexico on Monday. The Mexican government is now making concessions.

To appease US President Donald Trump in the migration dispute, Mexico wants to deploy 6,000 National Guardsmen on its Southern border. Mexican Foreign Minister, Marcelo Ebrard said this on Thursday in talks with US officials in Washington. This is to prevent the entry of Central American migrants on their way to the USA. The Mexican government wants to prevent with a set of concessions that Trump raises from Monday to punitive tariffs on Mexican imports.

Police Raids on Media Continue Alarming Trend

If there’s one thing we learned as children, it’s that terrible, horrible, no-good, very bad days can happen anywhere, even in Australia. Evidently, so can attacks on press freedom. Two police raids in two days on the nation’s public broadcaster, ABC, shocked those in and out of the country. For journalists and those concerned with protecting the freedom of the press, the raids are part of an alarming trend across ostensible western democracies.

Is Polling Broken? Australian Miss Continues Losing Streak

At around 9:30 p.m. Saturday night on Australia’s east coast, Antony Green, chief elections analyst at the ABC, made his announcement to a half-stunned, half-delirious nation. “At this stage, we think the Morrison Government has been reelected.” Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s conservative Coalition, widely expected to lose to Bill Shorten’s Labor Party after six turbulent years (and three Prime Ministers), instead won a majority government in the House of Representatives. For Labor, it was a crushing and baffling defeat in an election many thought un-losable. For the polling industry, however, the Coalition’s triumph was catastrophic, the latest high-profile miss over an abysmal and embarrassing three-year span.

As the Prime Ministership Turns: Australians Vote Saturday for Even More Change

Australians will be voting for a new Parliament, and possibly, their fourth Prime Minister in six years this weekend. Liberal incumbent Scott Morrison and Labor leader Bill Shorten have been neck and neck throughout the campaign. However, Aussies don’t seem to like either one of them, with up to a quarter unable to state a preference in the polls. Yet, voting is compulsory Down Under, so they’ll have to vote for one of them.

Australians go to the polls much more often than in other Westminster democracies, at every three years. Still, the frequent changes in party and national leadership have made the country something of an international joke.

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